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Transcriptional responses in a Drosophila defensive symbiosis.
Mol Ecol 2014; 23(6):1558-70ME

Abstract

Inherited symbionts are ubiquitous in insects and can have important consequences for the fitness of their hosts. Many inherited symbionts defend their hosts against parasites or other natural enemies; however, the means by which most symbionts confer protection is virtually unknown. We examine the mechanisms of defence in a recently discovered case of symbiont-mediated protection, where the bacterial symbiont Spiroplasma defends the fly Drosophila neotestacea from a virulent nematode parasite, Howardula aoronymphium. Using quantitative PCR of Spiroplasma infection intensities and whole transcriptome sequencing, we attempt to distinguish between the following modes of defence: symbiont-parasite competition, host immune priming and the production of toxic factors by Spiroplasma. Our findings do not support a model of exploitative competition between Howardula and Spiroplasma to mediate defence, nor do we find strong support for host immune priming during Spiroplasma infection. Interestingly, we recovered sequence for putative toxins encoded by Spiroplasma, including a novel putative ribosome-inactivating protein, transcripts of which are up-regulated in response to nematode exposure. Protection via the production of toxins may be a widely used and important mechanism in heritable defensive symbioses in insects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biology, University of Victoria, PO Box 1800, STN CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, V8W 2Y2.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24274471

Citation

Hamilton, Phineas T., et al. "Transcriptional Responses in a Drosophila Defensive Symbiosis." Molecular Ecology, vol. 23, no. 6, 2014, pp. 1558-70.
Hamilton PT, Leong JS, Koop BF, et al. Transcriptional responses in a Drosophila defensive symbiosis. Mol Ecol. 2014;23(6):1558-70.
Hamilton, P. T., Leong, J. S., Koop, B. F., & Perlman, S. J. (2014). Transcriptional responses in a Drosophila defensive symbiosis. Molecular Ecology, 23(6), pp. 1558-70. doi:10.1111/mec.12603.
Hamilton PT, et al. Transcriptional Responses in a Drosophila Defensive Symbiosis. Mol Ecol. 2014;23(6):1558-70. PubMed PMID: 24274471.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Transcriptional responses in a Drosophila defensive symbiosis. AU - Hamilton,Phineas T, AU - Leong,Jong S, AU - Koop,Ben F, AU - Perlman,Steve J, Y1 - 2013/12/28/ PY - 2013/08/09/received PY - 2013/11/15/revised PY - 2013/11/18/accepted PY - 2013/11/27/entrez PY - 2013/11/28/pubmed PY - 2014/6/24/medline KW - Spiroplasma KW - Wolbachia KW - competition KW - endosymbiont KW - mutualism KW - nematode KW - parasitism KW - transcriptome SP - 1558 EP - 70 JF - Molecular ecology JO - Mol. Ecol. VL - 23 IS - 6 N2 - Inherited symbionts are ubiquitous in insects and can have important consequences for the fitness of their hosts. Many inherited symbionts defend their hosts against parasites or other natural enemies; however, the means by which most symbionts confer protection is virtually unknown. We examine the mechanisms of defence in a recently discovered case of symbiont-mediated protection, where the bacterial symbiont Spiroplasma defends the fly Drosophila neotestacea from a virulent nematode parasite, Howardula aoronymphium. Using quantitative PCR of Spiroplasma infection intensities and whole transcriptome sequencing, we attempt to distinguish between the following modes of defence: symbiont-parasite competition, host immune priming and the production of toxic factors by Spiroplasma. Our findings do not support a model of exploitative competition between Howardula and Spiroplasma to mediate defence, nor do we find strong support for host immune priming during Spiroplasma infection. Interestingly, we recovered sequence for putative toxins encoded by Spiroplasma, including a novel putative ribosome-inactivating protein, transcripts of which are up-regulated in response to nematode exposure. Protection via the production of toxins may be a widely used and important mechanism in heritable defensive symbioses in insects. SN - 1365-294X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24274471/Transcriptional_responses_in_a_Drosophila_defensive_symbiosis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/mec.12603 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -