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Coffee has hepatoprotective benefits in Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C even in lower daily consumption than in American and European populations.
Braz J Infect Dis. 2014 Mar-Apr; 18(2):170-6.BJ

Abstract

The potential role of coffee as a hepatoprotective substance for chronic liver diseases has been widely discussed. Our main aim was to evaluate the effect of coffee intake regarding clinical, biochemical tests and liver biopsy data in treatment naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C. One hundred and thirty-six patients with chronic hepatitis C, diagnosed through liver biopsy, or by means of clinical, ultrasound or endoscopic signs of cirrhosis, were assessed by determination of biochemical tests, metabolic and morphological alterations. Food frequency was scrutinized by using a structured questionnaire. Coffee intake represented more than 90% of the total daily caffeine, and the 75th percentile was 4-Brazilian coffee-cup/day (≥ 255 mL/day or ≥ 123 mg caffeine/day). According to caffeine intake, patients were divided into two groups (< or ≥ 123 mg caffeine/day). Patients with higher ingestion of caffeine had lower serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (× upper limit of normal) (1.8 ± 1.5 vs 2.3 ± 1.5, p=0.04), lower frequencies of advanced (F3, F4) fibrosis (23.5% vs 54.5%, p<0.001) and of histological activity grade (A3, A4) observed in liver biopsies (13.8% vs 36.9%, p<0.001). By multivariate logistic regression, fibrosis was independently associated with caffeine intake (OR- 0.16; 95%CI - 0.03-0.80; p=0.026), γ-glutamil transferase serum levels and morphological activity. But only fibrosis was associated with histological activity. In conclusion caffeine consumption greater than 123 mg/day was associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis. In addition, this study supports the assumption that coffee intake has hepatoprotective benefits for Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C, even in lower doses than that of American and European population intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; Hospital Sírio Libanês, Sociedade Beneficente de Senhoras, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: sil_rodrigues@hotmail.com.Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil. Electronic address: drerparise@terra.com.br.Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24275378

Citation

Machado, Silmara Rodrigues, et al. "Coffee Has Hepatoprotective Benefits in Brazilian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Even in Lower Daily Consumption Than in American and European Populations." The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases, vol. 18, no. 2, 2014, pp. 170-6.
Machado SR, Parise ER, Carvalho Ld. Coffee has hepatoprotective benefits in Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C even in lower daily consumption than in American and European populations. Braz J Infect Dis. 2014;18(2):170-6.
Machado, S. R., Parise, E. R., & Carvalho, L. d. (2014). Coffee has hepatoprotective benefits in Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C even in lower daily consumption than in American and European populations. The Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases : an Official Publication of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases, 18(2), 170-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bjid.2013.09.001
Machado SR, Parise ER, Carvalho Ld. Coffee Has Hepatoprotective Benefits in Brazilian Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C Even in Lower Daily Consumption Than in American and European Populations. Braz J Infect Dis. 2014 Mar-Apr;18(2):170-6. PubMed PMID: 24275378.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Coffee has hepatoprotective benefits in Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C even in lower daily consumption than in American and European populations. AU - Machado,Silmara Rodrigues, AU - Parise,Edison Roberto, AU - Carvalho,Luciana de, Y1 - 2013/11/22/ PY - 2013/07/27/received PY - 2013/09/15/revised PY - 2013/09/17/accepted PY - 2013/11/27/entrez PY - 2013/11/28/pubmed PY - 2014/6/6/medline KW - Caffeine KW - Coffee KW - Fibrosis KW - Hepatitis C SP - 170 EP - 6 JF - The Brazilian journal of infectious diseases : an official publication of the Brazilian Society of Infectious Diseases JO - Braz J Infect Dis VL - 18 IS - 2 N2 - The potential role of coffee as a hepatoprotective substance for chronic liver diseases has been widely discussed. Our main aim was to evaluate the effect of coffee intake regarding clinical, biochemical tests and liver biopsy data in treatment naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C. One hundred and thirty-six patients with chronic hepatitis C, diagnosed through liver biopsy, or by means of clinical, ultrasound or endoscopic signs of cirrhosis, were assessed by determination of biochemical tests, metabolic and morphological alterations. Food frequency was scrutinized by using a structured questionnaire. Coffee intake represented more than 90% of the total daily caffeine, and the 75th percentile was 4-Brazilian coffee-cup/day (≥ 255 mL/day or ≥ 123 mg caffeine/day). According to caffeine intake, patients were divided into two groups (< or ≥ 123 mg caffeine/day). Patients with higher ingestion of caffeine had lower serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (× upper limit of normal) (1.8 ± 1.5 vs 2.3 ± 1.5, p=0.04), lower frequencies of advanced (F3, F4) fibrosis (23.5% vs 54.5%, p<0.001) and of histological activity grade (A3, A4) observed in liver biopsies (13.8% vs 36.9%, p<0.001). By multivariate logistic regression, fibrosis was independently associated with caffeine intake (OR- 0.16; 95%CI - 0.03-0.80; p=0.026), γ-glutamil transferase serum levels and morphological activity. But only fibrosis was associated with histological activity. In conclusion caffeine consumption greater than 123 mg/day was associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis. In addition, this study supports the assumption that coffee intake has hepatoprotective benefits for Brazilian patients with chronic hepatitis C, even in lower doses than that of American and European population intake. SN - 1678-4391 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24275378/Coffee_has_hepatoprotective_benefits_in_Brazilian_patients_with_chronic_hepatitis_C_even_in_lower_daily_consumption_than_in_American_and_European_populations_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1413-8670(13)00271-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -