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The relation between cognitive and motor performance and their relevance for children's transition to school: a latent variable approach.
Hum Mov Sci. 2014 Feb; 33:284-97.HM

Abstract

Both theoretically and empirically there is a continuous interest in understanding the specific relation between cognitive and motor development in childhood. In the present longitudinal study including three measurement points, this relation was targeted. At the beginning of the study, the participating children were 5-6-year-olds. By assessing participants' fine motor skills, their executive functioning, and their non-verbal intelligence, their cross-sectional and cross-lagged interrelations were examined. Additionally, performance in these three areas was used to predict early school achievement (in terms of mathematics, reading, and spelling) at the end of participants' first grade. Correlational analyses and structural equation modeling revealed that fine motor skills, non-verbal intelligence and executive functioning were significantly interrelated. Both fine motor skills and intelligence had significant links to later school achievement. However, when executive functioning was additionally included into the prediction of early academic achievement, fine motor skills and non-verbal intelligence were no longer significantly associated with later school performance suggesting that executive functioning plays an important role for the motor-cognitive performance link.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Cognition, Learning, and Memory, University of Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: roebers@psy.unibe.ch.Center for Cognition, Learning, and Memory, University of Bern, Switzerland.Center for Cognition, Learning, and Memory, University of Bern, Switzerland.Center for Cognition, Learning, and Memory, University of Bern, Switzerland.Center for Cognition, Learning, and Memory, University of Bern, Switzerland.Center for Cognition, Learning, and Memory, University of Bern, Switzerland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24289983

Citation

Roebers, Claudia M., et al. "The Relation Between Cognitive and Motor Performance and Their Relevance for Children's Transition to School: a Latent Variable Approach." Human Movement Science, vol. 33, 2014, pp. 284-97.
Roebers CM, Röthlisberger M, Neuenschwander R, et al. The relation between cognitive and motor performance and their relevance for children's transition to school: a latent variable approach. Hum Mov Sci. 2014;33:284-97.
Roebers, C. M., Röthlisberger, M., Neuenschwander, R., Cimeli, P., Michel, E., & Jäger, K. (2014). The relation between cognitive and motor performance and their relevance for children's transition to school: a latent variable approach. Human Movement Science, 33, 284-97. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.humov.2013.08.011
Roebers CM, et al. The Relation Between Cognitive and Motor Performance and Their Relevance for Children's Transition to School: a Latent Variable Approach. Hum Mov Sci. 2014;33:284-97. PubMed PMID: 24289983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The relation between cognitive and motor performance and their relevance for children's transition to school: a latent variable approach. AU - Roebers,Claudia M, AU - Röthlisberger,Marianne, AU - Neuenschwander,Regula, AU - Cimeli,Patrizia, AU - Michel,Eva, AU - Jäger,Katja, Y1 - 2013/11/28/ PY - 2012/10/04/received PY - 2013/07/10/revised PY - 2013/08/26/accepted PY - 2013/12/3/entrez PY - 2013/12/3/pubmed PY - 2014/11/5/medline KW - Academic achievement KW - Cognitive performance KW - Executive function KW - Fine motor skills KW - Motor control KW - School readiness SP - 284 EP - 97 JF - Human movement science JO - Hum Mov Sci VL - 33 N2 - Both theoretically and empirically there is a continuous interest in understanding the specific relation between cognitive and motor development in childhood. In the present longitudinal study including three measurement points, this relation was targeted. At the beginning of the study, the participating children were 5-6-year-olds. By assessing participants' fine motor skills, their executive functioning, and their non-verbal intelligence, their cross-sectional and cross-lagged interrelations were examined. Additionally, performance in these three areas was used to predict early school achievement (in terms of mathematics, reading, and spelling) at the end of participants' first grade. Correlational analyses and structural equation modeling revealed that fine motor skills, non-verbal intelligence and executive functioning were significantly interrelated. Both fine motor skills and intelligence had significant links to later school achievement. However, when executive functioning was additionally included into the prediction of early academic achievement, fine motor skills and non-verbal intelligence were no longer significantly associated with later school performance suggesting that executive functioning plays an important role for the motor-cognitive performance link. SN - 1872-7646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24289983/The_relation_between_cognitive_and_motor_performance_and_their_relevance_for_children's_transition_to_school:_a_latent_variable_approach_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-9457(13)00154-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -