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Relationships between sleep disturbances and gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asian sleep clinic referrals.
J Psychosom Res 2013; 75(6):551-5JP

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Studies on the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) have reported conflicting results, and attention has not been paid to the relationship between GERD and other sleep disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between GERD and various aspects of sleep disturbances.

METHODS

A total of 564 subjects who were referred to a sleep laboratory were enrolled in the study. They underwent nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG), and they were asked to complete a GERD questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items, and included questions on seven reflux symptoms, namely, heartburn, acid regurgitation, chest pain, hoarseness, globus sensation, coughing and epigastric soreness. Subjects reporting heartburn or acid regurgitation at least once a week were classified as having GERD.

RESULTS

Among 564 participants, 51 subjects (9.0%) were diagnosed as having GERD. GERD patients had higher scores in Beck depression inventory (p<.01), Epworth sleepiness scale (p=.03), Pittsburg sleep quality index (p<.01), more spontaneous arousals in NPSG, and more alcohol consumption than non-GERD patients. There was no association between presence of GERD, SAS-related variables, and body mass index (BMI). GERD was significantly associated with poor sleep quality (adjusted OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.3) and depressed mood (adjusted OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.3).

CONCLUSION

Poor subjective sleep and depressive symptoms are associated with the presence of GERD with no association between SAS, BMI and GERD. In managing patients with GERD, psychiatric and sleep symptoms need to be evaluated and appropriately treated.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Chungbuk National University Hospital, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24290045

Citation

Ju, Gawon, et al. "Relationships Between Sleep Disturbances and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asian Sleep Clinic Referrals." Journal of Psychosomatic Research, vol. 75, no. 6, 2013, pp. 551-5.
Ju G, Yoon IY, Lee SD, et al. Relationships between sleep disturbances and gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asian sleep clinic referrals. J Psychosom Res. 2013;75(6):551-5.
Ju, G., Yoon, I. Y., Lee, S. D., & Kim, N. (2013). Relationships between sleep disturbances and gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asian sleep clinic referrals. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 75(6), pp. 551-5. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychores.2013.10.004.
Ju G, et al. Relationships Between Sleep Disturbances and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Asian Sleep Clinic Referrals. J Psychosom Res. 2013;75(6):551-5. PubMed PMID: 24290045.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships between sleep disturbances and gastroesophageal reflux disease in Asian sleep clinic referrals. AU - Ju,Gawon, AU - Yoon,In-Young, AU - Lee,Sang Don, AU - Kim,Nayoung, Y1 - 2013/10/16/ PY - 2013/06/22/received PY - 2013/10/05/revised PY - 2013/10/08/accepted PY - 2013/12/3/entrez PY - 2013/12/3/pubmed PY - 2014/10/8/medline KW - Depression KW - Gastroesophageal reflux disease KW - Insomnia KW - Sleep apnea syndrome SP - 551 EP - 5 JF - Journal of psychosomatic research JO - J Psychosom Res VL - 75 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Studies on the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) have reported conflicting results, and attention has not been paid to the relationship between GERD and other sleep disorders. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between GERD and various aspects of sleep disturbances. METHODS: A total of 564 subjects who were referred to a sleep laboratory were enrolled in the study. They underwent nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG), and they were asked to complete a GERD questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items, and included questions on seven reflux symptoms, namely, heartburn, acid regurgitation, chest pain, hoarseness, globus sensation, coughing and epigastric soreness. Subjects reporting heartburn or acid regurgitation at least once a week were classified as having GERD. RESULTS: Among 564 participants, 51 subjects (9.0%) were diagnosed as having GERD. GERD patients had higher scores in Beck depression inventory (p<.01), Epworth sleepiness scale (p=.03), Pittsburg sleep quality index (p<.01), more spontaneous arousals in NPSG, and more alcohol consumption than non-GERD patients. There was no association between presence of GERD, SAS-related variables, and body mass index (BMI). GERD was significantly associated with poor sleep quality (adjusted OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.3) and depressed mood (adjusted OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.5-5.3). CONCLUSION: Poor subjective sleep and depressive symptoms are associated with the presence of GERD with no association between SAS, BMI and GERD. In managing patients with GERD, psychiatric and sleep symptoms need to be evaluated and appropriately treated. SN - 1879-1360 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24290045/Relationships_between_sleep_disturbances_and_gastroesophageal_reflux_disease_in_Asian_sleep_clinic_referrals_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-3999(13)00370-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -