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Effect of soy product kinako and fish oil on serum lipids and glucose metabolism in women with metabolic syndrome.
Nutrition. 2014 Jan; 30(1):112-5.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

At the doses typically used to treat hypertriacylglycerolemia, fish oil may increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to verify whether soy could attenuate the effects of fish oil on blood lipids and carbohydrate metabolism in patients with metabolic syndrome.

METHODS

Sixty-five women (47.9 ± 9.98 y) were studied with the use of a parallel, randomized design. The control group maintained the usual diet; the second group received 29.14 g/d of soy (kinako); the third group received 3 g/d of fish oil n-3 fatty acids; and the fourth group received fish oil (3 g/d) and kinako (29.14 g/d). Assessments were performed at baseline and after 45 and 90 d.

RESULTS

In relation to baseline values, fish oil increased (P < 0.05) total and LDL cholesterol, glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels after 90 d. Comparisons among groups demonstrated a decrease (P < 0.05) in total cholesterol in the fish oil and kinako group after 90 d as compared with the fish oil group. LDL cholesterol decreased (P < 0.01) in the kinako group as compared with the fish oil group. Blood glucose and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels decreased after 90 d (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) and insulin levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 45 d when the kinako group was compared with the fish oil group.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study showed that kinako moderates the adverse effects of high doses of fish oil on LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and glucose metabolism levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathology, Clinical Analysis and Toxicology, University of Londrina, Londrina, Paraná, Brazil.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24290606

Citation

Simão, Andréa Name Colado, et al. "Effect of Soy Product Kinako and Fish Oil On Serum Lipids and Glucose Metabolism in Women With Metabolic Syndrome." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 30, no. 1, 2014, pp. 112-5.
Simão AN, Lozovoy MA, Dichi I. Effect of soy product kinako and fish oil on serum lipids and glucose metabolism in women with metabolic syndrome. Nutrition. 2014;30(1):112-5.
Simão, A. N., Lozovoy, M. A., & Dichi, I. (2014). Effect of soy product kinako and fish oil on serum lipids and glucose metabolism in women with metabolic syndrome. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 30(1), 112-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nut.2013.05.024
Simão AN, Lozovoy MA, Dichi I. Effect of Soy Product Kinako and Fish Oil On Serum Lipids and Glucose Metabolism in Women With Metabolic Syndrome. Nutrition. 2014;30(1):112-5. PubMed PMID: 24290606.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of soy product kinako and fish oil on serum lipids and glucose metabolism in women with metabolic syndrome. AU - Simão,Andréa Name Colado, AU - Lozovoy,Marcell Alysson Batisti, AU - Dichi,Isaias, PY - 2012/12/30/received PY - 2013/05/15/revised PY - 2013/05/30/accepted PY - 2013/12/3/entrez PY - 2013/12/3/pubmed PY - 2014/7/18/medline KW - Fish oil KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - Soy KW - n-3 fatty acids SP - 112 EP - 5 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 30 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: At the doses typically used to treat hypertriacylglycerolemia, fish oil may increase low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and blood glucose levels. The aim of the present study was to verify whether soy could attenuate the effects of fish oil on blood lipids and carbohydrate metabolism in patients with metabolic syndrome. METHODS: Sixty-five women (47.9 ± 9.98 y) were studied with the use of a parallel, randomized design. The control group maintained the usual diet; the second group received 29.14 g/d of soy (kinako); the third group received 3 g/d of fish oil n-3 fatty acids; and the fourth group received fish oil (3 g/d) and kinako (29.14 g/d). Assessments were performed at baseline and after 45 and 90 d. RESULTS: In relation to baseline values, fish oil increased (P < 0.05) total and LDL cholesterol, glucose, insulin, and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels after 90 d. Comparisons among groups demonstrated a decrease (P < 0.05) in total cholesterol in the fish oil and kinako group after 90 d as compared with the fish oil group. LDL cholesterol decreased (P < 0.01) in the kinako group as compared with the fish oil group. Blood glucose and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance levels decreased after 90 d (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively) and insulin levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 45 d when the kinako group was compared with the fish oil group. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that kinako moderates the adverse effects of high doses of fish oil on LDL cholesterol, total cholesterol, and glucose metabolism levels. SN - 1873-1244 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24290606/Effect_of_soy_product_kinako_and_fish_oil_on_serum_lipids_and_glucose_metabolism_in_women_with_metabolic_syndrome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(13)00282-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -