Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The association of alcohol consumption and smoking with quality of life, disability and disease activity in an international sample of people with multiple sclerosis.
J Neurol Sci 2014; 336(1-2):211-9JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Modifiable lifestyle factors represent important targets for preventive intervention in multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to explore the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with major MS morbidity outcomes.

METHODS

We surveyed a large, international sample of people with MS recruited via Web 2.0 platforms about type of MS, relapse rates, disability, disease activity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), alcohol use and smoking.

RESULTS

Of 2469 respondents with confirmed MS, 11.7% were current and 40.3% former smokers. Most (61.5%) consumed less than 15 g alcohol weekly; few (0.8%) drank large amounts. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with increased HRQOL; and after controlling for age and gender, was associated with lower odds of significant disability (41% decrease). After controlling for age, gender and alcohol use, smokers had an increased likelihood of major mobility requirements by 90% compared to never smokers. There was no association between alcohol or smoking and relapse rate or disease activity after controlling for age and gender, however among former smokers, a longer duration of smoking cessation was associated with reduced disease activity. Smokers had significantly lower HRQOL than never smokers and former smokers; heavier smoking was associated with greater decreases in HRQOL.

CONCLUSION

This cross-sectional study supports previous research showing a link between morbidity indicators in MS and alcohol use and smoking. While people with MS should be advised of the potential risks of smoking, any risks and benefits of alcohol consumption require validation using a prospective cohort of people with MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Emergency Practice Innovation Centre, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne (St Vincent's Hospital), Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: Tracey.Weiland@svhm.org.au.Emergency Practice Innovation Centre, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Emergency Practice Innovation Centre, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Faculty of Medicine, Notre Dame University, Fremantle, Western Australia, Australia.Emergency Practice Innovation Centre, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.Emergency Practice Innovation Centre, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24290614

Citation

Weiland, Tracey J., et al. "The Association of Alcohol Consumption and Smoking With Quality of Life, Disability and Disease Activity in an International Sample of People With Multiple Sclerosis." Journal of the Neurological Sciences, vol. 336, no. 1-2, 2014, pp. 211-9.
Weiland TJ, Hadgkiss EJ, Jelinek GA, et al. The association of alcohol consumption and smoking with quality of life, disability and disease activity in an international sample of people with multiple sclerosis. J Neurol Sci. 2014;336(1-2):211-9.
Weiland, T. J., Hadgkiss, E. J., Jelinek, G. A., Pereira, N. G., Marck, C. H., & van der Meer, D. M. (2014). The association of alcohol consumption and smoking with quality of life, disability and disease activity in an international sample of people with multiple sclerosis. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 336(1-2), pp. 211-9. doi:10.1016/j.jns.2013.10.046.
Weiland TJ, et al. The Association of Alcohol Consumption and Smoking With Quality of Life, Disability and Disease Activity in an International Sample of People With Multiple Sclerosis. J Neurol Sci. 2014 Jan 15;336(1-2):211-9. PubMed PMID: 24290614.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The association of alcohol consumption and smoking with quality of life, disability and disease activity in an international sample of people with multiple sclerosis. AU - Weiland,Tracey J, AU - Hadgkiss,Emily J, AU - Jelinek,George A, AU - Pereira,Naresh G, AU - Marck,Claudia H, AU - van der Meer,Dania M, Y1 - 2013/11/08/ PY - 2013/07/25/received PY - 2013/10/17/revised PY - 2013/10/30/accepted PY - 2013/12/3/entrez PY - 2013/12/3/pubmed PY - 2014/9/30/medline KW - Alcohol KW - Disability KW - Multiple sclerosis KW - Quality of life KW - Relapse KW - Smoking KW - Survey SP - 211 EP - 9 JF - Journal of the neurological sciences JO - J. Neurol. Sci. VL - 336 IS - 1-2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Modifiable lifestyle factors represent important targets for preventive intervention in multiple sclerosis (MS). We aimed to explore the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with major MS morbidity outcomes. METHODS: We surveyed a large, international sample of people with MS recruited via Web 2.0 platforms about type of MS, relapse rates, disability, disease activity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL), alcohol use and smoking. RESULTS: Of 2469 respondents with confirmed MS, 11.7% were current and 40.3% former smokers. Most (61.5%) consumed less than 15 g alcohol weekly; few (0.8%) drank large amounts. Moderate alcohol consumption was associated with increased HRQOL; and after controlling for age and gender, was associated with lower odds of significant disability (41% decrease). After controlling for age, gender and alcohol use, smokers had an increased likelihood of major mobility requirements by 90% compared to never smokers. There was no association between alcohol or smoking and relapse rate or disease activity after controlling for age and gender, however among former smokers, a longer duration of smoking cessation was associated with reduced disease activity. Smokers had significantly lower HRQOL than never smokers and former smokers; heavier smoking was associated with greater decreases in HRQOL. CONCLUSION: This cross-sectional study supports previous research showing a link between morbidity indicators in MS and alcohol use and smoking. While people with MS should be advised of the potential risks of smoking, any risks and benefits of alcohol consumption require validation using a prospective cohort of people with MS. SN - 1878-5883 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24290614/The_association_of_alcohol_consumption_and_smoking_with_quality_of_life_disability_and_disease_activity_in_an_international_sample_of_people_with_multiple_sclerosis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0022-510X(13)03008-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -