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Maximal and explosive strength training elicit distinct neuromuscular adaptations, specific to the training stimulus.
Eur J Appl Physiol. 2014 Feb; 114(2):365-74.EJ

Abstract

PURPOSE

To compare the effects of short-term maximal (MST) vs. explosive (EST) strength training on maximal and explosive force production, and assess the neural adaptations underpinning any training-specific functional changes.

METHODS

Male participants completed either MST (n = 9) or EST (n = 10) for 4 weeks. In training participants were instructed to: contract as fast and hard as possible for ~1 s (EST); or contract progressively up to 75% maximal voluntary force (MVF) and hold for 3 s (MST). Pre- and post-training measurements included recording MVF during maximal voluntary contractions and explosive force at 50-ms intervals from force onset during explosive contractions. Neuromuscular activation was assessed by recording EMG RMS amplitude, normalised to a maximal M-wave and averaged across the three superficial heads of the quadriceps, at MVF and between 0-50, 0-100 and 0-150 ms during the explosive contractions.

RESULTS

Improvements in MVF were significantly greater (P < 0.001) following MST (+21 ± 12%) than EST (+11 ± 7%), which appeared due to a twofold greater increase in EMG at MVF following MST. In contrast, early phase explosive force (at 100 ms) increased following EST (+16 ± 14%), but not MST, resulting in a time × group interaction effect (P = 0.03), which appeared due to a greater increase in EMG during the early phase (first 50 ms) of explosive contractions following EST (P = 0.052).

CONCLUSIONS

These results provide evidence for distinct neuromuscular adaptations after MST vs. EST that are specific to the training stimulus, and demonstrate the independent adaptability of maximal and explosive strength.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Life Sciences, Whitelands College, University of Roehampton, Holybourne Avenue, London, SW15 4JD, UK, neale.tillin@roehampton.ac.uk.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24292019

Citation

Tillin, Neale A., and Jonathan P. Folland. "Maximal and Explosive Strength Training Elicit Distinct Neuromuscular Adaptations, Specific to the Training Stimulus." European Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 114, no. 2, 2014, pp. 365-74.
Tillin NA, Folland JP. Maximal and explosive strength training elicit distinct neuromuscular adaptations, specific to the training stimulus. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2014;114(2):365-74.
Tillin, N. A., & Folland, J. P. (2014). Maximal and explosive strength training elicit distinct neuromuscular adaptations, specific to the training stimulus. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 114(2), 365-74. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-013-2781-x
Tillin NA, Folland JP. Maximal and Explosive Strength Training Elicit Distinct Neuromuscular Adaptations, Specific to the Training Stimulus. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2014;114(2):365-74. PubMed PMID: 24292019.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maximal and explosive strength training elicit distinct neuromuscular adaptations, specific to the training stimulus. AU - Tillin,Neale A, AU - Folland,Jonathan P, Y1 - 2013/12/01/ PY - 2013/07/03/received PY - 2013/11/20/accepted PY - 2013/12/3/entrez PY - 2013/12/3/pubmed PY - 2014/9/26/medline SP - 365 EP - 74 JF - European journal of applied physiology JO - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. VL - 114 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: To compare the effects of short-term maximal (MST) vs. explosive (EST) strength training on maximal and explosive force production, and assess the neural adaptations underpinning any training-specific functional changes. METHODS: Male participants completed either MST (n = 9) or EST (n = 10) for 4 weeks. In training participants were instructed to: contract as fast and hard as possible for ~1 s (EST); or contract progressively up to 75% maximal voluntary force (MVF) and hold for 3 s (MST). Pre- and post-training measurements included recording MVF during maximal voluntary contractions and explosive force at 50-ms intervals from force onset during explosive contractions. Neuromuscular activation was assessed by recording EMG RMS amplitude, normalised to a maximal M-wave and averaged across the three superficial heads of the quadriceps, at MVF and between 0-50, 0-100 and 0-150 ms during the explosive contractions. RESULTS: Improvements in MVF were significantly greater (P < 0.001) following MST (+21 ± 12%) than EST (+11 ± 7%), which appeared due to a twofold greater increase in EMG at MVF following MST. In contrast, early phase explosive force (at 100 ms) increased following EST (+16 ± 14%), but not MST, resulting in a time × group interaction effect (P = 0.03), which appeared due to a greater increase in EMG during the early phase (first 50 ms) of explosive contractions following EST (P = 0.052). CONCLUSIONS: These results provide evidence for distinct neuromuscular adaptations after MST vs. EST that are specific to the training stimulus, and demonstrate the independent adaptability of maximal and explosive strength. SN - 1439-6327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24292019/Maximal_and_explosive_strength_training_elicit_distinct_neuromuscular_adaptations_specific_to_the_training_stimulus_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-013-2781-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -