Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Total knee replacement in patients with concomitant back pain results in a worse functional outcome and a lower rate of satisfaction.
Bone Joint J. 2013 Dec; 95-B(12):1632-9.BJ

Abstract

This study assessed the effect of concomitant back pain on the Oxford knee score (OKS), Short-Form (SF)-12 and patient satisfaction after total knee replacement (TKR). It involved a prospectively compiled database of demographics and outcome scores for 2392 patients undergoing primary TKR, of whom 829 patients (35%) reported back pain. Compared with those patients without back pain, those with back pain were more likely to be female (odds ratio (OR) 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 1.8)), have a greater level of comorbidity, a worse pre-operative OKS (2.3 points (95% CI 1.7 to 3.0)) and worse SF-12 physical (2.0 points (95% CI 1.4 to 2.6)) and mental (3.3 points (95% CI 2.3 to 4.3)) components. One year post-operatively, those with back pain had significantly worse outcome scores than those without with a mean difference in the OKS of 5 points (95% CI 3.8 to 5.4), in the SF-12 physical component of 6 points (95% CI 5.4 to 7.1) and in the mental component of 4 points (95% CI 3.1 to 4.9). Patients with back pain were less likely to be satisfied (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.78). After adjusting for confounding variables, concomitant back pain was an independent predictor of a worse post-operative OKS, and of dissatisfaction. Clinicians should be aware that patients suffering concomitant back pain pre-operatively are at an increased risk of being dissatisfied post-operatively.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Department of Orthopaedics and Trauma, 51 Little France Crescent, Edinburgh EH16 4SU, UK.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24293592

Citation

Clement, N D., et al. "Total Knee Replacement in Patients With Concomitant Back Pain Results in a Worse Functional Outcome and a Lower Rate of Satisfaction." The Bone & Joint Journal, vol. 95-B, no. 12, 2013, pp. 1632-9.
Clement ND, MacDonald D, Simpson AH, et al. Total knee replacement in patients with concomitant back pain results in a worse functional outcome and a lower rate of satisfaction. Bone Joint J. 2013;95-B(12):1632-9.
Clement, N. D., MacDonald, D., Simpson, A. H., & Burnett, R. (2013). Total knee replacement in patients with concomitant back pain results in a worse functional outcome and a lower rate of satisfaction. The Bone & Joint Journal, 95-B(12), 1632-9. https://doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.95B12.31684
Clement ND, et al. Total Knee Replacement in Patients With Concomitant Back Pain Results in a Worse Functional Outcome and a Lower Rate of Satisfaction. Bone Joint J. 2013;95-B(12):1632-9. PubMed PMID: 24293592.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Total knee replacement in patients with concomitant back pain results in a worse functional outcome and a lower rate of satisfaction. AU - Clement,N D, AU - MacDonald,D, AU - Simpson,A H R W, AU - Burnett,R, PY - 2013/12/3/entrez PY - 2013/12/3/pubmed PY - 2014/2/8/medline KW - Back pain KW - Lumbar KW - Outcome KW - Satisfaction KW - TKR KW - Total knee replacement SP - 1632 EP - 9 JF - The bone & joint journal JO - Bone Joint J VL - 95-B IS - 12 N2 - This study assessed the effect of concomitant back pain on the Oxford knee score (OKS), Short-Form (SF)-12 and patient satisfaction after total knee replacement (TKR). It involved a prospectively compiled database of demographics and outcome scores for 2392 patients undergoing primary TKR, of whom 829 patients (35%) reported back pain. Compared with those patients without back pain, those with back pain were more likely to be female (odds ratio (OR) 1.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 1.8)), have a greater level of comorbidity, a worse pre-operative OKS (2.3 points (95% CI 1.7 to 3.0)) and worse SF-12 physical (2.0 points (95% CI 1.4 to 2.6)) and mental (3.3 points (95% CI 2.3 to 4.3)) components. One year post-operatively, those with back pain had significantly worse outcome scores than those without with a mean difference in the OKS of 5 points (95% CI 3.8 to 5.4), in the SF-12 physical component of 6 points (95% CI 5.4 to 7.1) and in the mental component of 4 points (95% CI 3.1 to 4.9). Patients with back pain were less likely to be satisfied (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.78). After adjusting for confounding variables, concomitant back pain was an independent predictor of a worse post-operative OKS, and of dissatisfaction. Clinicians should be aware that patients suffering concomitant back pain pre-operatively are at an increased risk of being dissatisfied post-operatively. SN - 2049-4408 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24293592/Total_knee_replacement_in_patients_with_concomitant_back_pain_results_in_a_worse_functional_outcome_and_a_lower_rate_of_satisfaction_ L2 - https://online.boneandjoint.org.uk/doi/full/10.1302/0301-620X.95B12.31684?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -