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The identification of 'hotspots' of heavy metal pollution in soil-rice systems at a regional scale in eastern China.
Sci Total Environ. 2014 Feb 15; 472:407-20.ST

Abstract

Chinese agricultural soils and crops are suffering from increasing damage from heavy metals, which are introduced from various pollution sources including agriculture, traffic, mining and especially the flourishing private metal recycling industry. In this study, 219 pairs of rice grain and corresponding soil samples were collected from Wenling in Zhejiang Province to identify the spatial relationship and pollution hotspots of Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in the soil-rice system. The mean soil concentrations of heavy metals were 0.316 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 47.3 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 31.7 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 131 mg kg(-1) for Zn, and the metal concentrations in rice grain were 0.132 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 2.46 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 0.223 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 17.4 mg kg(-1) for Zn. The coefficient of variability (CV) of soil Cd, Cu and rice Cd were 147%, 146% and 180%, respectively, indicating an extensive variability. While the CVs of other metals ranged from 23.4% to 84.3% with a moderate variability. Kriging interpolation procedure and the Local Moran's I index detected the locations of pollution hotspots of these four metals. Cd and Cu had a very similar spatial pattern, with contamination hotspots located simultaneously in the northwestern part of the study area, and there were obvious hotspots for soil Zn in the north area, while in the northeast for soil Ni. The existence of hotspots may be due to industrialization and other anthropogenic activities. An Enrichment Index (EI) was employed to measure the uptake of heavy metals by rice. The results indicated that the accumulation and availability of heavy metals in the soil-rice system may be influenced by both soil heavy metal concentrations and soil physico-chemical properties. Cross-correlograms quantitatively illustrated that EIs were significantly correlated with soil properties. Soil pH and organic matter were the most important factors controlling the uptake of heavy metals by rice. As results, positive measures should be taken into account to control soil pollution and to curtail metal contamination to the food chain in the areas of Wenling, which were the most polluted by toxic metals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China. Electronic address: xmliu@zju.edu.cn.College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China. Electronic address: jmxu@zju.edu.cn.College of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Zhejiang Provincial Key Laboratory of Subtropical Soil and Plant Nutrition, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24295757

Citation

Li, Wanlu, et al. "The Identification of 'hotspots' of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soil-rice Systems at a Regional Scale in Eastern China." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 472, 2014, pp. 407-20.
Li W, Xu B, Song Q, et al. The identification of 'hotspots' of heavy metal pollution in soil-rice systems at a regional scale in eastern China. Sci Total Environ. 2014;472:407-20.
Li, W., Xu, B., Song, Q., Liu, X., Xu, J., & Brookes, P. C. (2014). The identification of 'hotspots' of heavy metal pollution in soil-rice systems at a regional scale in eastern China. The Science of the Total Environment, 472, 407-20. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.11.046
Li W, et al. The Identification of 'hotspots' of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soil-rice Systems at a Regional Scale in Eastern China. Sci Total Environ. 2014 Feb 15;472:407-20. PubMed PMID: 24295757.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The identification of 'hotspots' of heavy metal pollution in soil-rice systems at a regional scale in eastern China. AU - Li,Wanlu, AU - Xu,Binbin, AU - Song,Qiujin, AU - Liu,Xingmei, AU - Xu,Jianming, AU - Brookes,Philip C, Y1 - 2013/12/01/ PY - 2013/07/31/received PY - 2013/11/07/revised PY - 2013/11/09/accepted PY - 2013/12/4/entrez PY - 2013/12/4/pubmed PY - 2014/9/5/medline KW - Geostatistics KW - Heavy metals KW - Moran's I KW - Pollution hotspots KW - Spatial variability SP - 407 EP - 20 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci Total Environ VL - 472 N2 - Chinese agricultural soils and crops are suffering from increasing damage from heavy metals, which are introduced from various pollution sources including agriculture, traffic, mining and especially the flourishing private metal recycling industry. In this study, 219 pairs of rice grain and corresponding soil samples were collected from Wenling in Zhejiang Province to identify the spatial relationship and pollution hotspots of Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn in the soil-rice system. The mean soil concentrations of heavy metals were 0.316 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 47.3 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 31.7 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 131 mg kg(-1) for Zn, and the metal concentrations in rice grain were 0.132 mg kg(-1) for Cd, 2.46 mg kg(-1) for Cu, 0.223 mg kg(-1) for Ni and 17.4 mg kg(-1) for Zn. The coefficient of variability (CV) of soil Cd, Cu and rice Cd were 147%, 146% and 180%, respectively, indicating an extensive variability. While the CVs of other metals ranged from 23.4% to 84.3% with a moderate variability. Kriging interpolation procedure and the Local Moran's I index detected the locations of pollution hotspots of these four metals. Cd and Cu had a very similar spatial pattern, with contamination hotspots located simultaneously in the northwestern part of the study area, and there were obvious hotspots for soil Zn in the north area, while in the northeast for soil Ni. The existence of hotspots may be due to industrialization and other anthropogenic activities. An Enrichment Index (EI) was employed to measure the uptake of heavy metals by rice. The results indicated that the accumulation and availability of heavy metals in the soil-rice system may be influenced by both soil heavy metal concentrations and soil physico-chemical properties. Cross-correlograms quantitatively illustrated that EIs were significantly correlated with soil properties. Soil pH and organic matter were the most important factors controlling the uptake of heavy metals by rice. As results, positive measures should be taken into account to control soil pollution and to curtail metal contamination to the food chain in the areas of Wenling, which were the most polluted by toxic metals. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24295757/The_identification_of_'hotspots'_of_heavy_metal_pollution_in_soil_rice_systems_at_a_regional_scale_in_eastern_China_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -