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Genetically predicted testosterone and cardiovascular risk factors in men: a Mendelian randomization analysis in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.
Int J Epidemiol 2014; 43(1):140-8IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Observationally lower testosterone is associated with an unhealthier cardiovascular (CVD) risk profile, but this association is open to confounding and reverse causality. The authors examined the association of testosterone with well-established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)cholesterol and fasting glucose) and the Framingham score using a Mendelian randomization analysis with a separate-sample instrumental variable estimator.

METHODS

To minimize reverse causality, a genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on three selected testosterone-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). Multivariable censored and linear regressions were used to examine the association of genetically predicted testosterone levels with CVD risk factors and Framingham score among 4212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study.

RESULTS

Predicted testosterone was unrelated to systolic blood pressure [-0.11 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 0.48], diastolic blood pressure (0.04 mmHg, 95% CI -0.27 to 0.36), fasting glucose (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.06) or Framingham score (0.02, 95% CI -0.0001 to 0.03) but associated with higher LDL-cholesterol (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.04) and lower HDL-cholesterol (-0.01 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.02 to -0.001), after adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, smoking status, use of alcohol and body mass index).

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings did not corroborate observed protective effects of testosterone on cardiovascular risk factors or risk of ischaemic heart disease among men, but raises the possibility that higher testosterone may be associated with an unhealthier lipid profile.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China, Guangzhou Number 12 Hospital, Guangzhou, China, Department of Public Health and Epidemiology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK and CUNY School of Public Health and Hunter College, New York, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24302542

Citation

Zhao, Jie, et al. "Genetically Predicted Testosterone and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Men: a Mendelian Randomization Analysis in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 43, no. 1, 2014, pp. 140-8.
Zhao J, Jiang C, Lam TH, et al. Genetically predicted testosterone and cardiovascular risk factors in men: a Mendelian randomization analysis in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Int J Epidemiol. 2014;43(1):140-8.
Zhao, J., Jiang, C., Lam, T. H., Liu, B., Cheng, K. K., Xu, L., ... Schooling, C. M. (2014). Genetically predicted testosterone and cardiovascular risk factors in men: a Mendelian randomization analysis in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. International Journal of Epidemiology, 43(1), pp. 140-8. doi:10.1093/ije/dyt239.
Zhao J, et al. Genetically Predicted Testosterone and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Men: a Mendelian Randomization Analysis in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Int J Epidemiol. 2014;43(1):140-8. PubMed PMID: 24302542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetically predicted testosterone and cardiovascular risk factors in men: a Mendelian randomization analysis in the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. AU - Zhao,Jie, AU - Jiang,Chaoqiang, AU - Lam,Tai Hing, AU - Liu,Bin, AU - Cheng,Kar Keung, AU - Xu,Lin, AU - Au Yeung,Shiu Lun, AU - Zhang,Weisen, AU - Leung,Gabriel M, AU - Schooling,C Mary, Y1 - 2013/12/02/ PY - 2013/12/5/entrez PY - 2013/12/5/pubmed PY - 2015/2/3/medline KW - Mendelian randomization KW - cardiovascular disease KW - cholesterol KW - risk factors KW - testosterone SP - 140 EP - 8 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 43 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Observationally lower testosterone is associated with an unhealthier cardiovascular (CVD) risk profile, but this association is open to confounding and reverse causality. The authors examined the association of testosterone with well-established cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors (blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)cholesterol and fasting glucose) and the Framingham score using a Mendelian randomization analysis with a separate-sample instrumental variable estimator. METHODS: To minimize reverse causality, a genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on three selected testosterone-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). Multivariable censored and linear regressions were used to examine the association of genetically predicted testosterone levels with CVD risk factors and Framingham score among 4212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. RESULTS: Predicted testosterone was unrelated to systolic blood pressure [-0.11 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.70 to 0.48], diastolic blood pressure (0.04 mmHg, 95% CI -0.27 to 0.36), fasting glucose (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.06) or Framingham score (0.02, 95% CI -0.0001 to 0.03) but associated with higher LDL-cholesterol (0.02 mmol/l, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.04) and lower HDL-cholesterol (-0.01 mmol/l, 95% CI -0.02 to -0.001), after adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, smoking status, use of alcohol and body mass index). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings did not corroborate observed protective effects of testosterone on cardiovascular risk factors or risk of ischaemic heart disease among men, but raises the possibility that higher testosterone may be associated with an unhealthier lipid profile. SN - 1464-3685 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24302542/Genetically_predicted_testosterone_and_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_men:_a_Mendelian_randomization_analysis_in_the_Guangzhou_Biobank_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dyt239 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -