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Eye care use among a high-risk diabetic population seen in a public hospital's clinics.
JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014 Feb; 132(2):162-7.JO

Abstract

IMPORTANCE

Little is known regarding eye care use among low-income persons with diabetes mellitus, especially African Americans.

OBJECTIVE

To investigate eye care use among patients with diabetes who were seen in a county hospital clinic that primarily serves high-risk, low-income, non-Hispanic African American patients.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

A retrospective cohort study with 2 years of follow-up examined eye care use among adult patients with diabetes seen in 2007 in an outpatient medical clinic of a large, urban county hospital that primarily serves low-income, non-Hispanic African American patients. Patients with a history of retinopathy and macular edema or a current diagnosis indicating ophthalmic complications were excluded. Eye care use was defined dichotomously as whether or not patients had a visit to the eye clinic for any eye care examination or procedure. We estimated crude and adjusted rate ratios (aRRs) and 95% CIs for the association between eye care use and selected clinical and demographic characteristics.

RESULTS

There were 867 patients with diabetes identified: 61.9% were women, 76.2% were non-Hispanic African American, and 61.4% were indigent, with a mean age of 51.8 years. Eye care utilization rates were 33.2% within 1 and 45.0% within 2 years. For patients aged 19 to 39 years compared with those aged 65 years or older, significantly decreased eye care utilization rates were observed within 1 year (aRR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.84) and within 2 years (aRR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.99).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE

Overall eye care utilization rates were low. Additional education efforts to increase the perception of need among urban minority populations may be enhanced if focused on younger persons with diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham.Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham2Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of Alabama at Birmingham3Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham.Jefferson County Health System, Cooper Green Mercy Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama.Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham.Jefferson County Health System, Cooper Green Mercy Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama.Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Division of Diabetes Translation, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia.Department of Ophthalmology, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24310149

Citation

Maclennan, Paul A., et al. "Eye Care Use Among a High-risk Diabetic Population Seen in a Public Hospital's Clinics." JAMA Ophthalmology, vol. 132, no. 2, 2014, pp. 162-7.
Maclennan PA, McGwin G, Heckemeyer C, et al. Eye care use among a high-risk diabetic population seen in a public hospital's clinics. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014;132(2):162-7.
Maclennan, P. A., McGwin, G., Heckemeyer, C., Lolley, V. R., Hullett, S., Saaddine, J., Shrestha, S. S., & Owsley, C. (2014). Eye care use among a high-risk diabetic population seen in a public hospital's clinics. JAMA Ophthalmology, 132(2), 162-7. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.6046
Maclennan PA, et al. Eye Care Use Among a High-risk Diabetic Population Seen in a Public Hospital's Clinics. JAMA Ophthalmol. 2014;132(2):162-7. PubMed PMID: 24310149.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Eye care use among a high-risk diabetic population seen in a public hospital's clinics. AU - Maclennan,Paul A, AU - McGwin,Gerald,Jr AU - Heckemeyer,Christine, AU - Lolley,Virginia R, AU - Hullett,Sandral, AU - Saaddine,Jinan, AU - Shrestha,Sundar S, AU - Owsley,Cynthia, PY - 2013/12/7/entrez PY - 2013/12/7/pubmed PY - 2014/4/18/medline SP - 162 EP - 7 JF - JAMA ophthalmology JO - JAMA Ophthalmol VL - 132 IS - 2 N2 - IMPORTANCE: Little is known regarding eye care use among low-income persons with diabetes mellitus, especially African Americans. OBJECTIVE: To investigate eye care use among patients with diabetes who were seen in a county hospital clinic that primarily serves high-risk, low-income, non-Hispanic African American patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A retrospective cohort study with 2 years of follow-up examined eye care use among adult patients with diabetes seen in 2007 in an outpatient medical clinic of a large, urban county hospital that primarily serves low-income, non-Hispanic African American patients. Patients with a history of retinopathy and macular edema or a current diagnosis indicating ophthalmic complications were excluded. Eye care use was defined dichotomously as whether or not patients had a visit to the eye clinic for any eye care examination or procedure. We estimated crude and adjusted rate ratios (aRRs) and 95% CIs for the association between eye care use and selected clinical and demographic characteristics. RESULTS: There were 867 patients with diabetes identified: 61.9% were women, 76.2% were non-Hispanic African American, and 61.4% were indigent, with a mean age of 51.8 years. Eye care utilization rates were 33.2% within 1 and 45.0% within 2 years. For patients aged 19 to 39 years compared with those aged 65 years or older, significantly decreased eye care utilization rates were observed within 1 year (aRR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.84) and within 2 years (aRR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.99). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Overall eye care utilization rates were low. Additional education efforts to increase the perception of need among urban minority populations may be enhanced if focused on younger persons with diabetes. SN - 2168-6173 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24310149/Eye_care_use_among_a_high_risk_diabetic_population_seen_in_a_public_hospital's_clinics_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaophthalmology/fullarticle/10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.6046 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -