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The aftermath of public housing relocations: relationships between changes in local socioeconomic conditions and depressive symptoms in a cohort of adult relocaters.
J Urban Health. 2014 Apr; 91(2):223-41.JU

Abstract

USA is experiencing a paradigm shift in public housing policy: while policies used to place people who qualified for housing assistance into spatially concentrated housing complexes, they now seek to geographically disperse them, often to voucher-subsidized rental units in the private market. Programs that relocate residents from public housing complexes tend to move them to neighborhoods that are less impoverished and less violent. To date, studies have reached conflicting findings about the relationship between public housing relocations and depression among adult relocaters. The present longitudinal multilevel analysis tests the hypothesis that pre-/postrelocation improvements in local economic conditions, social disorder, and perceived community violence are associated with declines in depressive symptoms in a cohort of African-American adults; active substance misusers were oversampled. We tested this hypothesis in a cohort of 172 adults who were living in one of seven public housing complexes scheduled for relocation and demolition in Atlanta, GA; by design, 20% were dependent on substances and 50% misused substances but were not dependent. Baseline data captured prerelocation characteristics of participants; of the seven census tracts where they lived, three waves of postrelocation data were gathered approximately every 9 months thereafter. Surveys were administered at each wave to assess depressive symptoms measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), perceived community violence, and other individual-level covariates. Participants' home addresses were geocoded to census tracts at each wave, and administrative data sources were used to characterize tract-level economic disadvantage and social disorder. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel models. Between waves 1 and 2, participants experienced significant improvements in reported depressive symptoms and perceived community violence and in tract-level economic disadvantage and social disorder; these reductions were sustained across waves 2-4. A 1 standard deviation improvement in economic conditions was associated with a 1-unit reduction in CES-D scores; the magnitude of this relationship did not vary by baseline substance misuse or gender. Reduced perceived community violence also predicted lower CES-D scores. Our objective measure of social disorder was unrelated to depressive symptoms. We found that relocaters who experienced greater pre-/postrelocation improvements in economic conditions or in perceived community violence experienced fewer depressive symptoms. Combined with past research, these findings suggest that relocation initiatives should focus on the quality of the places to which relocaters move; future research should also identify pathways linking pre-/postrelocation changes in place characteristics to changes in mental health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rollins School of Public Health, Atlanta, GA, USA, hcoope3@emory.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24311024

Citation

Cooper, Hannah L F., et al. "The Aftermath of Public Housing Relocations: Relationships Between Changes in Local Socioeconomic Conditions and Depressive Symptoms in a Cohort of Adult Relocaters." Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, vol. 91, no. 2, 2014, pp. 223-41.
Cooper HL, Hunter-Jones J, Kelley ME, et al. The aftermath of public housing relocations: relationships between changes in local socioeconomic conditions and depressive symptoms in a cohort of adult relocaters. J Urban Health. 2014;91(2):223-41.
Cooper, H. L., Hunter-Jones, J., Kelley, M. E., Karnes, C., Haley, D. F., Ross, Z., Rothenberg, R., & Bonney, L. E. (2014). The aftermath of public housing relocations: relationships between changes in local socioeconomic conditions and depressive symptoms in a cohort of adult relocaters. Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 91(2), 223-41. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11524-013-9844-5
Cooper HL, et al. The Aftermath of Public Housing Relocations: Relationships Between Changes in Local Socioeconomic Conditions and Depressive Symptoms in a Cohort of Adult Relocaters. J Urban Health. 2014;91(2):223-41. PubMed PMID: 24311024.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The aftermath of public housing relocations: relationships between changes in local socioeconomic conditions and depressive symptoms in a cohort of adult relocaters. AU - Cooper,Hannah L F, AU - Hunter-Jones,Josalin, AU - Kelley,Mary E, AU - Karnes,Conny, AU - Haley,Danielle F, AU - Ross,Zev, AU - Rothenberg,Richard, AU - Bonney,Loida E, PY - 2013/12/7/entrez PY - 2013/12/7/pubmed PY - 2014/12/17/medline SP - 223 EP - 41 JF - Journal of urban health : bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine JO - J Urban Health VL - 91 IS - 2 N2 - USA is experiencing a paradigm shift in public housing policy: while policies used to place people who qualified for housing assistance into spatially concentrated housing complexes, they now seek to geographically disperse them, often to voucher-subsidized rental units in the private market. Programs that relocate residents from public housing complexes tend to move them to neighborhoods that are less impoverished and less violent. To date, studies have reached conflicting findings about the relationship between public housing relocations and depression among adult relocaters. The present longitudinal multilevel analysis tests the hypothesis that pre-/postrelocation improvements in local economic conditions, social disorder, and perceived community violence are associated with declines in depressive symptoms in a cohort of African-American adults; active substance misusers were oversampled. We tested this hypothesis in a cohort of 172 adults who were living in one of seven public housing complexes scheduled for relocation and demolition in Atlanta, GA; by design, 20% were dependent on substances and 50% misused substances but were not dependent. Baseline data captured prerelocation characteristics of participants; of the seven census tracts where they lived, three waves of postrelocation data were gathered approximately every 9 months thereafter. Surveys were administered at each wave to assess depressive symptoms measured using the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), perceived community violence, and other individual-level covariates. Participants' home addresses were geocoded to census tracts at each wave, and administrative data sources were used to characterize tract-level economic disadvantage and social disorder. Hypotheses were tested using multilevel models. Between waves 1 and 2, participants experienced significant improvements in reported depressive symptoms and perceived community violence and in tract-level economic disadvantage and social disorder; these reductions were sustained across waves 2-4. A 1 standard deviation improvement in economic conditions was associated with a 1-unit reduction in CES-D scores; the magnitude of this relationship did not vary by baseline substance misuse or gender. Reduced perceived community violence also predicted lower CES-D scores. Our objective measure of social disorder was unrelated to depressive symptoms. We found that relocaters who experienced greater pre-/postrelocation improvements in economic conditions or in perceived community violence experienced fewer depressive symptoms. Combined with past research, these findings suggest that relocation initiatives should focus on the quality of the places to which relocaters move; future research should also identify pathways linking pre-/postrelocation changes in place characteristics to changes in mental health. SN - 1468-2869 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24311024/The_aftermath_of_public_housing_relocations:_relationships_between_changes_in_local_socioeconomic_conditions_and_depressive_symptoms_in_a_cohort_of_adult_relocaters_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11524-013-9844-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -