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Primary care physician communication at hospital discharge reduces medication discrepancies.
J Hosp Med 2013; 8(12):672-7JH

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Medication discrepancies are common as patients transition from hospital to home. Errors with post-discharge medication regimens may play a role in hospital readmissions.

OBJECTIVES

To determine whether primary care physician (PCP) contact with patients at hospital discharge impacts the frequency of medication discrepancies at 24 hours post-discharge.

DESIGN

With the PCP-Enhanced Discharge Communication Intervention, PCPs were asked to speak with treating hospitalists and contact patients within 24 hours of hospital discharge (either in person or by phone) to discuss any hospital medication changes. Research staff enrolled subjects during their hospitalization and telephoned subjects 48 hours post-discharge to determine medication discrepancies and PCP contact.

PARTICIPANTS

One hundred fourteen community-dwelling adults, admitted to acute medicine services >24 hours on ≥ 5 medications.

RESULTS

Of the 114 subjects enrolled in the hospital, 75 subjects completed 48 hours postdischarge phone interviews. Of the 75 study patients, 39 patients (50.6%) experienced a total of 84 medication discrepancies (mean, 2.1 discrepancies/patient). Subjects who were contacted by their PCP at discharge were 70% less likely to have a discrepancy when compared with those not contacted (P = 0.04). Males were 4.34 times more likely to have a discrepancy (P = 0.02).

CONCLUSION

PCP communication with patients within 24 hours of discharge was associated with decreased medication discrepancies. Our results further demonstrate the importance of PCP involvement in the hospital discharge process.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24311447

Citation

Lindquist, Lee A., et al. "Primary Care Physician Communication at Hospital Discharge Reduces Medication Discrepancies." Journal of Hospital Medicine, vol. 8, no. 12, 2013, pp. 672-7.
Lindquist LA, Yamahiro A, Garrett A, et al. Primary care physician communication at hospital discharge reduces medication discrepancies. J Hosp Med. 2013;8(12):672-7.
Lindquist, L. A., Yamahiro, A., Garrett, A., Zei, C., & Feinglass, J. M. (2013). Primary care physician communication at hospital discharge reduces medication discrepancies. Journal of Hospital Medicine, 8(12), pp. 672-7. doi:10.1002/jhm.2098.
Lindquist LA, et al. Primary Care Physician Communication at Hospital Discharge Reduces Medication Discrepancies. J Hosp Med. 2013;8(12):672-7. PubMed PMID: 24311447.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Primary care physician communication at hospital discharge reduces medication discrepancies. AU - Lindquist,Lee A, AU - Yamahiro,Atsuko, AU - Garrett,Arianne, AU - Zei,Charles, AU - Feinglass,Joseph M, Y1 - 2013/11/01/ PY - 2013/06/28/received PY - 2013/09/27/revised PY - 2013/09/27/accepted PY - 2013/12/7/entrez PY - 2013/12/7/pubmed PY - 2014/8/19/medline SP - 672 EP - 7 JF - Journal of hospital medicine JO - J Hosp Med VL - 8 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Medication discrepancies are common as patients transition from hospital to home. Errors with post-discharge medication regimens may play a role in hospital readmissions. OBJECTIVES: To determine whether primary care physician (PCP) contact with patients at hospital discharge impacts the frequency of medication discrepancies at 24 hours post-discharge. DESIGN: With the PCP-Enhanced Discharge Communication Intervention, PCPs were asked to speak with treating hospitalists and contact patients within 24 hours of hospital discharge (either in person or by phone) to discuss any hospital medication changes. Research staff enrolled subjects during their hospitalization and telephoned subjects 48 hours post-discharge to determine medication discrepancies and PCP contact. PARTICIPANTS: One hundred fourteen community-dwelling adults, admitted to acute medicine services >24 hours on ≥ 5 medications. RESULTS: Of the 114 subjects enrolled in the hospital, 75 subjects completed 48 hours postdischarge phone interviews. Of the 75 study patients, 39 patients (50.6%) experienced a total of 84 medication discrepancies (mean, 2.1 discrepancies/patient). Subjects who were contacted by their PCP at discharge were 70% less likely to have a discrepancy when compared with those not contacted (P = 0.04). Males were 4.34 times more likely to have a discrepancy (P = 0.02). CONCLUSION: PCP communication with patients within 24 hours of discharge was associated with decreased medication discrepancies. Our results further demonstrate the importance of PCP involvement in the hospital discharge process. SN - 1553-5606 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24311447/Primary_care_physician_communication_at_hospital_discharge_reduces_medication_discrepancies_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jhm.2098 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -