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The effect of shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, and internalizing tendencies on nonsuicidal self-injury.
Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2014 Jun; 44(3):317-30.SL

Abstract

Nonsuicidal self-injury is especially common in adolescents and young adults. Self-injury may be related to shame or guilt--two moral emotions--as these differentially predict other maladaptive behaviors. Using a college sample, we examined not only how shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, and internalizing emotional tendencies related to self-injury, but also whether these moral emotions moderate the relation between internalizing tendencies and self-injury. High shame-proneness was associated with higher frequencies of self-injury. High guilt-proneness was associated with less self-injury, although this effect was mitigated at higher levels of internalizing tendencies. These results suggest shame-proneness is a risk factor for self-injury, while guilt-proneness is protective.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24313627

Citation

VanDerhei, Susan, et al. "The Effect of Shame-proneness, Guilt-proneness, and Internalizing Tendencies On Nonsuicidal Self-injury." Suicide & Life-threatening Behavior, vol. 44, no. 3, 2014, pp. 317-30.
VanDerhei S, Rojahn J, Stuewig J, et al. The effect of shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, and internalizing tendencies on nonsuicidal self-injury. Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2014;44(3):317-30.
VanDerhei, S., Rojahn, J., Stuewig, J., & McKnight, P. E. (2014). The effect of shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, and internalizing tendencies on nonsuicidal self-injury. Suicide & Life-threatening Behavior, 44(3), 317-30. https://doi.org/10.1111/sltb.12069
VanDerhei S, et al. The Effect of Shame-proneness, Guilt-proneness, and Internalizing Tendencies On Nonsuicidal Self-injury. Suicide Life Threat Behav. 2014;44(3):317-30. PubMed PMID: 24313627.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, and internalizing tendencies on nonsuicidal self-injury. AU - VanDerhei,Susan, AU - Rojahn,Johannes, AU - Stuewig,Jeffrey, AU - McKnight,Patrick E, Y1 - 2013/12/07/ PY - 2013/03/26/received PY - 2013/08/30/accepted PY - 2013/12/10/entrez PY - 2013/12/10/pubmed PY - 2015/2/3/medline SP - 317 EP - 30 JF - Suicide & life-threatening behavior JO - Suicide Life Threat Behav VL - 44 IS - 3 N2 - Nonsuicidal self-injury is especially common in adolescents and young adults. Self-injury may be related to shame or guilt--two moral emotions--as these differentially predict other maladaptive behaviors. Using a college sample, we examined not only how shame-proneness, guilt-proneness, and internalizing emotional tendencies related to self-injury, but also whether these moral emotions moderate the relation between internalizing tendencies and self-injury. High shame-proneness was associated with higher frequencies of self-injury. High guilt-proneness was associated with less self-injury, although this effect was mitigated at higher levels of internalizing tendencies. These results suggest shame-proneness is a risk factor for self-injury, while guilt-proneness is protective. SN - 1943-278X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24313627/The_effect_of_shame_proneness_guilt_proneness_and_internalizing_tendencies_on_nonsuicidal_self_injury_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/sltb.12069 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -