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Diet quality is associated with circulating C-reactive protein but not irisin levels in humans.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Adherence to a healthy diet has been shown to decrease the incidence of obesity and associated comorbidities. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an established inflammatory marker and irisin was recently identified as a molecule which may play a role in energy regulation and obesity but whether diet alters irisin levels remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the association between circulating irisin, leptin, and CRP levels and dietary quantity and quality using the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) and the Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMED).

MATERIALS/METHODS

The study evaluated dietary data and biomarker levels of 151 participants between 2009 and 2011 (71 male vs. 80 female, over 35 years old, obese 43.7%). AHEI and aMED scores were calculated based on data derived from self-administered 110-item food-frequency questionnaires estimating usual nutrient intake over the past year. Cross-sectional associations between dietary quantity, quality, body composition by bioelectric impedance, and biomarker levels including irisin, leptin, and CRP after fasting were assessed.

RESULTS

CRP, but not irisin, was negatively correlated with AHEI (r=-0.34) and aMED (r=-0.31). Irisin was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.22), fat mass (r=0.21), waist circumference (r=0.24), waist-hip ratio (r=0.20), leptin (r=0.32), and CRP (r=0.25). Participants with the highest AHEI scores tended to have 11.6% lower concentrations of irisin (P for trend =0.09), but they were not significant after adjustment for potential confounders. Better diet quality was associated with lower CRP concentrations (P for trend=0.02) in multivariate model. Percentage of energy from carbohydrate was inversely associated with CRP.

CONCLUSIONS

Unlike CRP, irisin is not associated with dietary quality or quantity.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Department of Family Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University, Gyeonggi-do, 431-796, Korea. Electronic address: beloved920@gmail.com.

    ,

    Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

    ,

    Department of Internal Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215.

    ,

    Judge Baker Children's Center, Boston, MA.

    ,

    Judge Baker Children's Center, Boston, MA; Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY.

    Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Section of Endocrinology, Boston VA Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02130, USA.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Biomarkers
    Body Composition
    Body Mass Index
    C-Reactive Protein
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet, Mediterranean
    Electric Impedance
    Energy Intake
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Fibronectins
    Humans
    Leptin
    Male
    Middle Aged

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24315778

    Citation

    Park, Kyung Hee, et al. "Diet Quality Is Associated With Circulating C-reactive Protein but Not Irisin Levels in Humans." Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, vol. 63, no. 2, 2014, pp. 233-41.
    Park KH, Zaichenko L, Peter P, et al. Diet quality is associated with circulating C-reactive protein but not irisin levels in humans. Metab Clin Exp. 2014;63(2):233-41.
    Park, K. H., Zaichenko, L., Peter, P., Davis, C. R., Crowell, J. A., & Mantzoros, C. S. (2014). Diet quality is associated with circulating C-reactive protein but not irisin levels in humans. Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, 63(2), pp. 233-41. doi:10.1016/j.metabol.2013.10.011.
    Park KH, et al. Diet Quality Is Associated With Circulating C-reactive Protein but Not Irisin Levels in Humans. Metab Clin Exp. 2014;63(2):233-41. PubMed PMID: 24315778.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Diet quality is associated with circulating C-reactive protein but not irisin levels in humans. AU - Park,Kyung Hee, AU - Zaichenko,Lesya, AU - Peter,Patricia, AU - Davis,Cynthia R, AU - Crowell,Judith A, AU - Mantzoros,Christos S, Y1 - 2013/10/29/ PY - 2013/07/11/received PY - 2013/10/24/revised PY - 2013/10/25/accepted PY - 2013/12/10/entrez PY - 2013/12/10/pubmed PY - 2014/3/8/medline KW - AHEI KW - Alternate Healthy Eating Index KW - Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score KW - BIDMC KW - BMI KW - Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center KW - Body mass index KW - C-reactive protein KW - Dietary pattern KW - FFQ KW - Food Frequency Questionnaire KW - Irisin KW - MDS KW - Mediterranean Diet KW - Mediterranean Diet Score KW - WHR KW - aMED KW - waist–hip ratio. SP - 233 EP - 41 JF - Metabolism: clinical and experimental JO - Metab. Clin. Exp. VL - 63 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Adherence to a healthy diet has been shown to decrease the incidence of obesity and associated comorbidities. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an established inflammatory marker and irisin was recently identified as a molecule which may play a role in energy regulation and obesity but whether diet alters irisin levels remains unknown. We aimed to investigate the association between circulating irisin, leptin, and CRP levels and dietary quantity and quality using the Alternate Healthy Eating Index (AHEI) and the Alternate Mediterranean Diet Score (aMED). MATERIALS/METHODS: The study evaluated dietary data and biomarker levels of 151 participants between 2009 and 2011 (71 male vs. 80 female, over 35 years old, obese 43.7%). AHEI and aMED scores were calculated based on data derived from self-administered 110-item food-frequency questionnaires estimating usual nutrient intake over the past year. Cross-sectional associations between dietary quantity, quality, body composition by bioelectric impedance, and biomarker levels including irisin, leptin, and CRP after fasting were assessed. RESULTS: CRP, but not irisin, was negatively correlated with AHEI (r=-0.34) and aMED (r=-0.31). Irisin was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.22), fat mass (r=0.21), waist circumference (r=0.24), waist-hip ratio (r=0.20), leptin (r=0.32), and CRP (r=0.25). Participants with the highest AHEI scores tended to have 11.6% lower concentrations of irisin (P for trend =0.09), but they were not significant after adjustment for potential confounders. Better diet quality was associated with lower CRP concentrations (P for trend=0.02) in multivariate model. Percentage of energy from carbohydrate was inversely associated with CRP. CONCLUSIONS: Unlike CRP, irisin is not associated with dietary quality or quantity. SN - 1532-8600 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24315778/Diet_quality_is_associated_with_circulating_C_reactive_protein_but_not_irisin_levels_in_humans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0026-0495(13)00356-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -