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The health consequences of teenage fertility.
Fam Plann Perspect 1985 May-Jun; 17(3):132-9FP

Abstract

A review of the literature on the health consequences of teenage pregnancy and childbirth shows remarkable similarity in findings from studies conducted in the United States, Canada, Britain, France and Sweden. In particular, results of studies conducted since 1970 have tended to indicate that the increased risk of maternal complications from pregnancy and delivery among teenagers--especially those older than 15--is associated more with socioeconomic factors than with the biological effects of age. Smaller differences in maternal mortality between teenagers and older women exist in England and Wales than in the United States and France; this finding suggests that England and Wales may have minimized the age or socioeconomic factors contributing to a difference in rates. Inadequate prenatal care may be a major cause of pregnancy-related complications for mothers, since teenagers in all countries are more likely than older mothers to seek care late in the pregnancy or not all. There is a very marked association between young age of mother and low birth weight in all countries. Sweden has the lowest rate of low birth weight at all maternal ages, and the United States generally has the highest. Some of the apparent effect of young maternal age on birth weight may be because the birth is likely to be the mother's first, and first births have a higher incidence of prematurity. As in the case of maternal health, inadequate prenatal care has been singled out as an important determinant of both prematurity and low birth weight. Late fetal death rates in the United States, England and Wales, and France are slightly higher among teenagers than among women in their 20s. In Canada and Sweden, however, no substantially increased risk for young women is found. Perinatal death rates, which one might expect to be influenced more by environmental factors than are late fetal deaths, show a more marked increase among infants of teenagers than do rates of late fetal deaths. Again, Sweden does not fit the pattern. Studies that separate data for young teens and older teenage mothers also indicate that increased perinatal and late fetal mortality rates may occur only among very young teenage mothers. There is no evidence of an overall increase in congenital malformations among babies born to teenagers. When individual birth defects are examined, some studies have shown increased rates of cardiovascular and central nervous system malformations among the children of teenage mothers.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2431924

Citation

Makinson, C. "The Health Consequences of Teenage Fertility." Family Planning Perspectives, vol. 17, no. 3, 1985, pp. 132-9.
Makinson C. The health consequences of teenage fertility. Fam Plann Perspect. 1985;17(3):132-9.
Makinson, C. (1985). The health consequences of teenage fertility. Family Planning Perspectives, 17(3), pp. 132-9.
Makinson C. The Health Consequences of Teenage Fertility. Fam Plann Perspect. 1985;17(3):132-9. PubMed PMID: 2431924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The health consequences of teenage fertility. A1 - Makinson,C, PY - 1985/5/1/pubmed PY - 1985/5/1/medline PY - 1985/5/1/entrez KW - Adolescent Pregnancy KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Biological Characteristics KW - Biology KW - Birth Order KW - Birth Weight KW - Canada KW - Child Health KW - Child Mortality KW - Congenital Abnormalities KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Economic Factors KW - Europe KW - Fertility KW - First Birth KW - France KW - Health KW - Infant Mortality KW - Literature Review KW - Low Birth Weight KW - Maternal Health KW - Maternal Health Services KW - Maternal Mortality KW - Mediterranean Countries KW - Mortality KW - Neonatal Mortality KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Northern Europe KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Pregnancy KW - Pregnancy Complications KW - Pregnancy Outcomes KW - Prenatal Care KW - Program Acceptability KW - Reproduction KW - Reproductive Behavior KW - Scandinavia KW - Socioeconomic Factors KW - Sweden KW - United Kingdom KW - United States KW - Western Europe SP - 132 EP - 9 JF - Family planning perspectives JO - Fam Plann Perspect VL - 17 IS - 3 N2 - A review of the literature on the health consequences of teenage pregnancy and childbirth shows remarkable similarity in findings from studies conducted in the United States, Canada, Britain, France and Sweden. In particular, results of studies conducted since 1970 have tended to indicate that the increased risk of maternal complications from pregnancy and delivery among teenagers--especially those older than 15--is associated more with socioeconomic factors than with the biological effects of age. Smaller differences in maternal mortality between teenagers and older women exist in England and Wales than in the United States and France; this finding suggests that England and Wales may have minimized the age or socioeconomic factors contributing to a difference in rates. Inadequate prenatal care may be a major cause of pregnancy-related complications for mothers, since teenagers in all countries are more likely than older mothers to seek care late in the pregnancy or not all. There is a very marked association between young age of mother and low birth weight in all countries. Sweden has the lowest rate of low birth weight at all maternal ages, and the United States generally has the highest. Some of the apparent effect of young maternal age on birth weight may be because the birth is likely to be the mother's first, and first births have a higher incidence of prematurity. As in the case of maternal health, inadequate prenatal care has been singled out as an important determinant of both prematurity and low birth weight. Late fetal death rates in the United States, England and Wales, and France are slightly higher among teenagers than among women in their 20s. In Canada and Sweden, however, no substantially increased risk for young women is found. Perinatal death rates, which one might expect to be influenced more by environmental factors than are late fetal deaths, show a more marked increase among infants of teenagers than do rates of late fetal deaths. Again, Sweden does not fit the pattern. Studies that separate data for young teens and older teenage mothers also indicate that increased perinatal and late fetal mortality rates may occur only among very young teenage mothers. There is no evidence of an overall increase in congenital malformations among babies born to teenagers. When individual birth defects are examined, some studies have shown increased rates of cardiovascular and central nervous system malformations among the children of teenage mothers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) SN - 0014-7354 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2431924/The_health_consequences_of_teenage_fertility_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/healthproblemsinpregnancy.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -