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Tobacco smoking cessation and improved gastroesophageal reflux: a prospective population-based cohort study: the HUNT study.
Am J Gastroenterol 2014; 109(2):171-7AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Tobacco smoking increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS), but whether tobacco smoking cessation improves GERS is unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify if tobacco smoking cessation improves GERS.

METHODS

The study was based on the Nord-Trøndelag health study (the HUNT study), a prospective population-based cohort study conducted from 1995-1997 to 2006-2009 in Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway. All residents of the county from 20 years of age were invited. The study included 29,610 individuals (61% response rate) who reported whether they had heartburn or acid regurgitation. The association between tobacco smoking cessation and improvement in GERS was assessed by logistic regression, providing odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The analyses were stratified by antireflux medication, and the results were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, education, and physical exercise. Subgroup analyses were also stratified by BMI.

RESULTS

Among individuals using antireflux medication at least weekly, cessation of daily tobacco smoking was associated with improvement in GERS from severe to no or minor complaints (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI: 1.07-2.97), compared with persistent daily smoking. This association was present among individuals within the normal range of BMI (OR 5.67; 95% CI: 1.36-23.64), but not among overweight individuals. There was no association between tobacco smoking cessation and GERS status among individuals with minor GERS or individuals using antireflux medication less than weekly.

CONCLUSIONS

Tobacco smoking cessation was associated with improvement in severe GERS only in individuals of normal BMI using antireflux medication at least weekly, but not in other individual with GERS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1] HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway [2] Department of Internal Medicine, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Hospital Trust, Levanger, Norway.Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.1] Upper Gastrointestinal Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden [2] Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, London, UK.HUNT Research Centre, Department of Public Health and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Levanger, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24322837

Citation

Ness-Jensen, Eivind, et al. "Tobacco Smoking Cessation and Improved Gastroesophageal Reflux: a Prospective Population-based Cohort Study: the HUNT Study." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 109, no. 2, 2014, pp. 171-7.
Ness-Jensen E, Lindam A, Lagergren J, et al. Tobacco smoking cessation and improved gastroesophageal reflux: a prospective population-based cohort study: the HUNT study. Am J Gastroenterol. 2014;109(2):171-7.
Ness-Jensen, E., Lindam, A., Lagergren, J., & Hveem, K. (2014). Tobacco smoking cessation and improved gastroesophageal reflux: a prospective population-based cohort study: the HUNT study. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 109(2), pp. 171-7. doi:10.1038/ajg.2013.414.
Ness-Jensen E, et al. Tobacco Smoking Cessation and Improved Gastroesophageal Reflux: a Prospective Population-based Cohort Study: the HUNT Study. Am J Gastroenterol. 2014;109(2):171-7. PubMed PMID: 24322837.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tobacco smoking cessation and improved gastroesophageal reflux: a prospective population-based cohort study: the HUNT study. AU - Ness-Jensen,Eivind, AU - Lindam,Anna, AU - Lagergren,Jesper, AU - Hveem,Kristian, Y1 - 2013/12/10/ PY - 2013/06/18/received PY - 2013/10/30/accepted PY - 2013/12/11/entrez PY - 2013/12/11/pubmed PY - 2014/4/8/medline SP - 171 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am. J. Gastroenterol. VL - 109 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Tobacco smoking increases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS), but whether tobacco smoking cessation improves GERS is unclear. The aim of this study was to clarify if tobacco smoking cessation improves GERS. METHODS: The study was based on the Nord-Trøndelag health study (the HUNT study), a prospective population-based cohort study conducted from 1995-1997 to 2006-2009 in Nord-Trøndelag County, Norway. All residents of the county from 20 years of age were invited. The study included 29,610 individuals (61% response rate) who reported whether they had heartburn or acid regurgitation. The association between tobacco smoking cessation and improvement in GERS was assessed by logistic regression, providing odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The analyses were stratified by antireflux medication, and the results were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption, education, and physical exercise. Subgroup analyses were also stratified by BMI. RESULTS: Among individuals using antireflux medication at least weekly, cessation of daily tobacco smoking was associated with improvement in GERS from severe to no or minor complaints (adjusted OR 1.78; 95% CI: 1.07-2.97), compared with persistent daily smoking. This association was present among individuals within the normal range of BMI (OR 5.67; 95% CI: 1.36-23.64), but not among overweight individuals. There was no association between tobacco smoking cessation and GERS status among individuals with minor GERS or individuals using antireflux medication less than weekly. CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco smoking cessation was associated with improvement in severe GERS only in individuals of normal BMI using antireflux medication at least weekly, but not in other individual with GERS. SN - 1572-0241 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24322837/Tobacco_smoking_cessation_and_improved_gastroesophageal_reflux:_a_prospective_population_based_cohort_study:_the_HUNT_study_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=24322837 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -