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Changes in 'extra' food intake among Australian children between 1995 and 2007.
Obes Res Clin Pract 2011 Jan-Mar; 5(1):e1-e78OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the consumption patterns of energy-dense, nutrient-poor 'extra' foods among Australian children and to determine any changes in consumption since the 1995 National Nutrition Survey (1995 NNS).

METHODS

'Extra' food consumption was analysed by age group and gender using 24-h recall data from the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2007 Survey; n = 4380) and the 1995 NNS (n = 2435). Differences in percent consuming, amounts consumed and percent energy contribution were assessed.

RESULTS

'Extra' foods contributed 35% to daily energy intake in the 2007 survey, ranging from 24% in the 2-3 year olds to 38% in the 9-13 and 14-16 year olds. The foods contributing most to energy intake included 'fried potatoes' (2.9%), 'cakes, muffins, slices' (2.9%) and 'potato crisps and similar snacks' (2.6%). Compared to the 1995 NNS, total energy intake was significantly lower in the 2007 Survey (8621 kJ in 1995 versus 8330 kJ in 2007), as was the consumption of 'extra' foods (both in terms of weight and energy) (3645 kJ in 1995 versus 3049 kJ in 2007). All age groups reported a decline in energy intake from 'extra' foods of approximately 600 kJ.

CONCLUSION

The overall consumption of 'extra' foods seems to have decreased from 1995 to 2007. However, 'extra' foods continue to be over-consumed by Australian children and continuous monitoring of 'extra' foods consumption is highly warranted.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Cluster for Public Health Nutrition, Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition and Exercise, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. Electronic address:anna.rangan@sydney.edu.au.Cluster for Public Health Nutrition, Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition and Exercise, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences, The University of Wollongong, NSW 2522, Australia.Cluster for Public Health Nutrition, Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition and Exercise, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.Cluster for Public Health Nutrition, Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition and Exercise, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24331011

Citation

Rangan, Anna M., et al. "Changes in 'extra' Food Intake Among Australian Children Between 1995 and 2007." Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, vol. 5, no. 1, 2011, pp. e1-e78.
Rangan AM, Kwan J, Flood VM, et al. Changes in 'extra' food intake among Australian children between 1995 and 2007. Obes Res Clin Pract. 2011;5(1):e1-e78.
Rangan, A. M., Kwan, J., Flood, V. M., Louie, J. C., & Gill, T. P. (2011). Changes in 'extra' food intake among Australian children between 1995 and 2007. Obesity Research & Clinical Practice, 5(1), pp. e1-e78. doi:10.1016/j.orcp.2010.12.001.
Rangan AM, et al. Changes in 'extra' Food Intake Among Australian Children Between 1995 and 2007. Obes Res Clin Pract. 2011;5(1):e1-e78. PubMed PMID: 24331011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in 'extra' food intake among Australian children between 1995 and 2007. AU - Rangan,Anna M, AU - Kwan,Janis, AU - Flood,Victoria M, AU - Louie,Jimmy Chun Yu, AU - Gill,Timothy P, PY - 2010/06/08/received PY - 2010/12/16/revised PY - 2010/12/16/accepted PY - 2013/12/17/entrez PY - 2011/1/1/pubmed PY - 2011/1/1/medline SP - e1 EP - e78 JF - Obesity research & clinical practice JO - Obes Res Clin Pract VL - 5 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the consumption patterns of energy-dense, nutrient-poor 'extra' foods among Australian children and to determine any changes in consumption since the 1995 National Nutrition Survey (1995 NNS). METHODS: 'Extra' food consumption was analysed by age group and gender using 24-h recall data from the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (2007 Survey; n = 4380) and the 1995 NNS (n = 2435). Differences in percent consuming, amounts consumed and percent energy contribution were assessed. RESULTS: 'Extra' foods contributed 35% to daily energy intake in the 2007 survey, ranging from 24% in the 2-3 year olds to 38% in the 9-13 and 14-16 year olds. The foods contributing most to energy intake included 'fried potatoes' (2.9%), 'cakes, muffins, slices' (2.9%) and 'potato crisps and similar snacks' (2.6%). Compared to the 1995 NNS, total energy intake was significantly lower in the 2007 Survey (8621 kJ in 1995 versus 8330 kJ in 2007), as was the consumption of 'extra' foods (both in terms of weight and energy) (3645 kJ in 1995 versus 3049 kJ in 2007). All age groups reported a decline in energy intake from 'extra' foods of approximately 600 kJ. CONCLUSION: The overall consumption of 'extra' foods seems to have decreased from 1995 to 2007. However, 'extra' foods continue to be over-consumed by Australian children and continuous monitoring of 'extra' foods consumption is highly warranted. SN - 1871-403X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24331011/Changes_in_'extra'_food_intake_among_Australian_children_between_1995_and_2007_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1871-403X(10)00291-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -