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Prevalence and correlates of victimization and weapon carrying among military- and nonmilitary-connected youth in Southern California.
Prev Med. 2014 Mar; 60:21-6.PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The present analysis sought to explore the normative rates and correlates of school victimization and weapon carrying among military-connected and nonmilitary-connected youth in public schools in Southern California.

METHODS

Data are from a sub-sample of the 2011 California Healthy Kids Survey (N=14,512). Items to assess victimization and weapon carrying were separated into three categories: physical acts (e.g., being pushed or shoved), nonphysical acts (e.g., having rumors spread about them) and weapon carrying.

RESULTS

The bivariate results indicate that youth with a military-connected parent had higher rates of physical victimization (56.8%), nonphysical victimization (68.1%), and weapon carrying (14.4%) compared to those with siblings serving (55.2%, 65.2%, and 11.4%, respectively) and nonmilitary-connected (50.3%, 61.6%, and 8.9%, respectively) youth. Having a parent in the military increased the odds of weapon carrying by 29% (Odds Ratio=1.29, 95% confidence interval=1.02-1.65). Changing schools and a larger number of family member deployments in the past 10years were associated with significant increases in the likelihood of victimization and weapon carrying.

CONCLUSIONS

The results of this analysis warrant a focus on school supports for youth experiencing parental military service, multiple relocations and deployments of a family member.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Southern California, School of Social Work, 669 W 34th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0411, USA. Electronic address: tgilreat@usc.edu.University of Southern California, School of Social Work, 669 W 34th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0411, USA.University of Southern California, School of Social Work, 669 W 34th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0411, USA.University of Southern California, School of Social Work, 669 W 34th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0411, USA.Bar Ilan University, Louis and Gabi Weisfeld School of Social Work, Ramat Gan 5290002, Israel.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24333605

Citation

Gilreath, Tamika D., et al. "Prevalence and Correlates of Victimization and Weapon Carrying Among Military- and Nonmilitary-connected Youth in Southern California." Preventive Medicine, vol. 60, 2014, pp. 21-6.
Gilreath TD, Astor RA, Cederbaum JA, et al. Prevalence and correlates of victimization and weapon carrying among military- and nonmilitary-connected youth in Southern California. Prev Med. 2014;60:21-6.
Gilreath, T. D., Astor, R. A., Cederbaum, J. A., Atuel, H., & Benbenishty, R. (2014). Prevalence and correlates of victimization and weapon carrying among military- and nonmilitary-connected youth in Southern California. Preventive Medicine, 60, 21-6. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2013.12.002
Gilreath TD, et al. Prevalence and Correlates of Victimization and Weapon Carrying Among Military- and Nonmilitary-connected Youth in Southern California. Prev Med. 2014;60:21-6. PubMed PMID: 24333605.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and correlates of victimization and weapon carrying among military- and nonmilitary-connected youth in Southern California. AU - Gilreath,Tamika D, AU - Astor,Ron A, AU - Cederbaum,Julie A, AU - Atuel,Hazel, AU - Benbenishty,Rami, Y1 - 2013/12/11/ PY - 2013/05/29/received PY - 2013/11/21/revised PY - 2013/12/03/accepted PY - 2013/12/17/entrez PY - 2013/12/18/pubmed PY - 2014/11/5/medline KW - Adolescents KW - Military KW - School victimization SP - 21 EP - 6 JF - Preventive medicine JO - Prev Med VL - 60 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The present analysis sought to explore the normative rates and correlates of school victimization and weapon carrying among military-connected and nonmilitary-connected youth in public schools in Southern California. METHODS: Data are from a sub-sample of the 2011 California Healthy Kids Survey (N=14,512). Items to assess victimization and weapon carrying were separated into three categories: physical acts (e.g., being pushed or shoved), nonphysical acts (e.g., having rumors spread about them) and weapon carrying. RESULTS: The bivariate results indicate that youth with a military-connected parent had higher rates of physical victimization (56.8%), nonphysical victimization (68.1%), and weapon carrying (14.4%) compared to those with siblings serving (55.2%, 65.2%, and 11.4%, respectively) and nonmilitary-connected (50.3%, 61.6%, and 8.9%, respectively) youth. Having a parent in the military increased the odds of weapon carrying by 29% (Odds Ratio=1.29, 95% confidence interval=1.02-1.65). Changing schools and a larger number of family member deployments in the past 10years were associated with significant increases in the likelihood of victimization and weapon carrying. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this analysis warrant a focus on school supports for youth experiencing parental military service, multiple relocations and deployments of a family member. SN - 1096-0260 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24333605/Prevalence_and_correlates_of_victimization_and_weapon_carrying_among_military__and_nonmilitary_connected_youth_in_Southern_California_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-7435(13)00456-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -