Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Trends in the parent-report of health care provider-diagnosed and medicated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: United States, 2003-2011.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Data from the 2003 and 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) reflect the increasing prevalence of parent-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis and treatment by health care providers. This report updates these prevalence estimates for 2011 and describes temporal trends.

METHOD

Weighted analyses were conducted with 2011 NSCH data to estimate prevalence of parent-reported ADHD diagnosis, current ADHD, current medication treatment, ADHD severity, and mean age of diagnosis for U.S. children/adolescents aged 4 to 17 years and among demographic subgroups. A history of ADHD diagnosis (2003-2011), as well as current ADHD and medication treatment prevalence (2007-2011), were compared using prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals.

RESULTS

In 2011, 11% of children/adolescents aged 4 to 17 years had ever received an ADHD diagnosis (6.4 million children). Among those with a history of ADHD diagnosis, 83% were reported as currently having ADHD (8.8%); 69% of children with current ADHD were taking medication for ADHD (6.1%, 3.5 million children). A parent-reported history of ADHD increased by 42% from 2003 to 2011. Prevalence of a history of ADHD, current ADHD, medicated ADHD, and moderate/severe ADHD increased significantly from 2007 estimates. Prevalence of medicated ADHD increased by 28% from 2007 to 2011.

CONCLUSIONS

Approximately 2 million more U.S. children/adolescents aged 4 to 17 years had been diagnosed with ADHD in 2011, compared to 2003. More than two-thirds of those with current ADHD were taking medication for treatment in 2011. This suggests an increasing burden of ADHD on the U.S. health care system. Efforts to further understand ADHD diagnostic and treatment patterns are warranted.

Links

  • PMC Free PDF
  • PMC Free Full Text
  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Electronic address: svisser@cdc.gov.

    ,

    Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    ,

    Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    ,

    Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    ,

    Office of Epidemiology and Research, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration.

    ,

    Office of Epidemiology and Research, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration.

    ,

    Division of Human Development and Disability, National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Division of Health Interview Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, CDC.

    Source

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity
    Child
    Child, Preschool
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Prevalence
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24342384

    Citation

    Visser, Susanna N., et al. "Trends in the Parent-report of Health Care Provider-diagnosed and Medicated Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder: United States, 2003-2011." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 53, no. 1, 2014, pp. 34-46.e2.
    Visser SN, Danielson ML, Bitsko RH, et al. Trends in the parent-report of health care provider-diagnosed and medicated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: United States, 2003-2011. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014;53(1):34-46.e2.
    Visser, S. N., Danielson, M. L., Bitsko, R. H., Holbrook, J. R., Kogan, M. D., Ghandour, R. M., ... Blumberg, S. J. (2014). Trends in the parent-report of health care provider-diagnosed and medicated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: United States, 2003-2011. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53(1), pp. 34-46.e2. doi:10.1016/j.jaac.2013.09.001.
    Visser SN, et al. Trends in the Parent-report of Health Care Provider-diagnosed and Medicated Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder: United States, 2003-2011. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014;53(1):34-46.e2. PubMed PMID: 24342384.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Trends in the parent-report of health care provider-diagnosed and medicated attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: United States, 2003-2011. AU - Visser,Susanna N, AU - Danielson,Melissa L, AU - Bitsko,Rebecca H, AU - Holbrook,Joseph R, AU - Kogan,Michael D, AU - Ghandour,Reem M, AU - Perou,Ruth, AU - Blumberg,Stephen J, Y1 - 2013/11/21/ PY - 2013/04/10/received PY - 2013/07/29/revised PY - 2013/09/11/accepted PY - 2013/12/18/entrez PY - 2013/12/18/pubmed PY - 2015/4/10/medline KW - attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) KW - epidemiology KW - medication KW - prevalence KW - stimulants SP - 34 EP - 46.e2 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry JO - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 53 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Data from the 2003 and 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) reflect the increasing prevalence of parent-reported attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) diagnosis and treatment by health care providers. This report updates these prevalence estimates for 2011 and describes temporal trends. METHOD: Weighted analyses were conducted with 2011 NSCH data to estimate prevalence of parent-reported ADHD diagnosis, current ADHD, current medication treatment, ADHD severity, and mean age of diagnosis for U.S. children/adolescents aged 4 to 17 years and among demographic subgroups. A history of ADHD diagnosis (2003-2011), as well as current ADHD and medication treatment prevalence (2007-2011), were compared using prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: In 2011, 11% of children/adolescents aged 4 to 17 years had ever received an ADHD diagnosis (6.4 million children). Among those with a history of ADHD diagnosis, 83% were reported as currently having ADHD (8.8%); 69% of children with current ADHD were taking medication for ADHD (6.1%, 3.5 million children). A parent-reported history of ADHD increased by 42% from 2003 to 2011. Prevalence of a history of ADHD, current ADHD, medicated ADHD, and moderate/severe ADHD increased significantly from 2007 estimates. Prevalence of medicated ADHD increased by 28% from 2007 to 2011. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 2 million more U.S. children/adolescents aged 4 to 17 years had been diagnosed with ADHD in 2011, compared to 2003. More than two-thirds of those with current ADHD were taking medication for treatment in 2011. This suggests an increasing burden of ADHD on the U.S. health care system. Efforts to further understand ADHD diagnostic and treatment patterns are warranted. SN - 1527-5418 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24342384/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0890-8567(13)00594-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -