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Application of pitch range evaluation subsequent to arytenoid adduction and thyroplasty.
J Voice. 2014 May; 28(3):394.e5-12.JV

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to figure out the application of pitch range (PR) evaluation subsequent to arytenoid adduction (AA) combined with type 1 thyroplasty (TP1) in unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP).

STUDY DESIGN

Retrospective review of clinical records.

METHODS

Subjects were 50 patients with UVFP for whom PR and maximum phonation time (MPT) could be evaluated before and 1 year after AA + TP1. Subjects were divided into two groups based on preoperative PR (pre-PR) (group 1: ≤1 semitone (ST); group 2: ≥2 ST). Correlations among pre-PR and post-PR, MPT, and age were assessed. We also evaluated PRs in subjects with PR deterioration and PRs by causative diseases.

RESULTS

PR was significantly extended from a median of 17.0-22.0 ST in all subjects. Pre-PR was correlated with post-PR. Post-PR correlated with post-MPT in group 2 but not in group 1. There was no correlation between post-PR and age or causative diseases. The mean change in PR among subjects with PR deterioration (28.0%, 14/50) was -3.6 ST. Pre-PR and the improvement of post-PR were negatively correlated in group 2.

CONCLUSION

PR evaluation can be useful for predicting post-PR. The effects of age and causative diseases were small compared with other factors, such as pre-PR width and surgical effects. The successful surgery may improve both PR and MPT. However, several cases showed obvious discrepancy of those postoperative improvements. It will be necessary to assess this discrepancy, particularly in subjects with postoperative voice insufficiency.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Otolaryngology, International University of Health and Welfare, Mita Hospital, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Department of Otolaryngology, Tokyo Medical University, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan. Electronic address: ujimotokn@gmail.com.Department of Otolaryngology, International University of Health and Welfare, Mita Hospital, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Tokyo Voice Center, International University of Health and Welfare, Sanno Hospital, Minato-Ku, Tokyo, Japan.Department of Otolaryngology, International University of Health and Welfare, Mita Hospital, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24345604

Citation

Konomi, Ujimoto, et al. "Application of Pitch Range Evaluation Subsequent to Arytenoid Adduction and Thyroplasty." Journal of Voice : Official Journal of the Voice Foundation, vol. 28, no. 3, 2014, pp. 394.e5-12.
Konomi U, Watanabe Y, Komazawa D. Application of pitch range evaluation subsequent to arytenoid adduction and thyroplasty. J Voice. 2014;28(3):394.e5-12.
Konomi, U., Watanabe, Y., & Komazawa, D. (2014). Application of pitch range evaluation subsequent to arytenoid adduction and thyroplasty. Journal of Voice : Official Journal of the Voice Foundation, 28(3), e5-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jvoice.2013.10.018
Konomi U, Watanabe Y, Komazawa D. Application of Pitch Range Evaluation Subsequent to Arytenoid Adduction and Thyroplasty. J Voice. 2014;28(3):394.e5-12. PubMed PMID: 24345604.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of pitch range evaluation subsequent to arytenoid adduction and thyroplasty. AU - Konomi,Ujimoto, AU - Watanabe,Yusuke, AU - Komazawa,Daigo, Y1 - 2013/12/15/ PY - 2013/08/03/received PY - 2013/10/23/accepted PY - 2013/12/19/entrez PY - 2013/12/19/pubmed PY - 2014/12/31/medline KW - Arytenoid adduction KW - Pitch range KW - Thyroplasty KW - Vocal fold paralysis KW - Voice therapy SP - 394.e5 EP - 12 JF - Journal of voice : official journal of the Voice Foundation JO - J Voice VL - 28 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to figure out the application of pitch range (PR) evaluation subsequent to arytenoid adduction (AA) combined with type 1 thyroplasty (TP1) in unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review of clinical records. METHODS: Subjects were 50 patients with UVFP for whom PR and maximum phonation time (MPT) could be evaluated before and 1 year after AA + TP1. Subjects were divided into two groups based on preoperative PR (pre-PR) (group 1: ≤1 semitone (ST); group 2: ≥2 ST). Correlations among pre-PR and post-PR, MPT, and age were assessed. We also evaluated PRs in subjects with PR deterioration and PRs by causative diseases. RESULTS: PR was significantly extended from a median of 17.0-22.0 ST in all subjects. Pre-PR was correlated with post-PR. Post-PR correlated with post-MPT in group 2 but not in group 1. There was no correlation between post-PR and age or causative diseases. The mean change in PR among subjects with PR deterioration (28.0%, 14/50) was -3.6 ST. Pre-PR and the improvement of post-PR were negatively correlated in group 2. CONCLUSION: PR evaluation can be useful for predicting post-PR. The effects of age and causative diseases were small compared with other factors, such as pre-PR width and surgical effects. The successful surgery may improve both PR and MPT. However, several cases showed obvious discrepancy of those postoperative improvements. It will be necessary to assess this discrepancy, particularly in subjects with postoperative voice insufficiency. SN - 1873-4588 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24345604/Application_of_pitch_range_evaluation_subsequent_to_arytenoid_adduction_and_thyroplasty_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0892-1997(13)00231-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -