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Canine superficial bacterial folliculitis: current understanding of its etiology, diagnosis and treatment.
Vet J. 2014 Feb; 199(2):217-22.VJ

Abstract

Superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF) is more common in the dog than other mammalian species. Until recently, a successful outcome in cases of canine SBF was possible by administering a potentiated amoxicillin, a first generation cephalosporin or a potentiated sulfonamide. Unfortunately, this predictable susceptibility has changed, because methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) and Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are becoming more prevalent in canine SBF cases. The increasing frequency of multidrug resistance complicates the selection of antimicrobial therapy. Antimicrobial agents that were once rarely used in cases of canine SBF, such as amikacin, rifampicin and chloramphenicol, are becoming the drugs of choice, based on bacterial culture and susceptibility testing. Furthermore, changes in antimicrobial susceptibility have helped to re-emphasize the importance of a multimodal approach to treatment of the disease, including topical therapy. Due to the increasing frequency of identification of highly resistant Staphylococcus spp., topical antimicrobial therapy, including the use of diluted sodium hypochlorite (bleach), is becoming necessary to successfully treat some cases of canine SBF. Other important antiseptics that can be used include chlorhexidine, benzoyl peroxide, ethyl lactate, triclosan and boric acid/acetic acid. This review discusses the diagnostic and therapeutic management of canine SBF, with a special emphasis on treating methicillin resistant staphylococcal infections.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Allergy, Skin and Ear Clinic for Pets, 31205 Five Mile Road, Livonia, MI 48154, USA. Electronic address: dermdoc@cvm.msu.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24345778

Citation

Bloom, Paul. "Canine Superficial Bacterial Folliculitis: Current Understanding of Its Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment." Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997), vol. 199, no. 2, 2014, pp. 217-22.
Bloom P. Canine superficial bacterial folliculitis: current understanding of its etiology, diagnosis and treatment. Vet J. 2014;199(2):217-22.
Bloom, P. (2014). Canine superficial bacterial folliculitis: current understanding of its etiology, diagnosis and treatment. Veterinary Journal (London, England : 1997), 199(2), 217-22. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.11.014
Bloom P. Canine Superficial Bacterial Folliculitis: Current Understanding of Its Etiology, Diagnosis and Treatment. Vet J. 2014;199(2):217-22. PubMed PMID: 24345778.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Canine superficial bacterial folliculitis: current understanding of its etiology, diagnosis and treatment. A1 - Bloom,Paul, Y1 - 2013/11/23/ PY - 2012/10/22/received PY - 2013/11/13/revised PY - 2013/11/17/accepted PY - 2013/12/19/entrez PY - 2013/12/19/pubmed PY - 2015/4/7/medline KW - Antimicrobial resistance KW - Canine KW - Methicillin KW - Pyoderma KW - Staphylococcus SP - 217 EP - 22 JF - Veterinary journal (London, England : 1997) JO - Vet. J. VL - 199 IS - 2 N2 - Superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF) is more common in the dog than other mammalian species. Until recently, a successful outcome in cases of canine SBF was possible by administering a potentiated amoxicillin, a first generation cephalosporin or a potentiated sulfonamide. Unfortunately, this predictable susceptibility has changed, because methicillin resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) and Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are becoming more prevalent in canine SBF cases. The increasing frequency of multidrug resistance complicates the selection of antimicrobial therapy. Antimicrobial agents that were once rarely used in cases of canine SBF, such as amikacin, rifampicin and chloramphenicol, are becoming the drugs of choice, based on bacterial culture and susceptibility testing. Furthermore, changes in antimicrobial susceptibility have helped to re-emphasize the importance of a multimodal approach to treatment of the disease, including topical therapy. Due to the increasing frequency of identification of highly resistant Staphylococcus spp., topical antimicrobial therapy, including the use of diluted sodium hypochlorite (bleach), is becoming necessary to successfully treat some cases of canine SBF. Other important antiseptics that can be used include chlorhexidine, benzoyl peroxide, ethyl lactate, triclosan and boric acid/acetic acid. This review discusses the diagnostic and therapeutic management of canine SBF, with a special emphasis on treating methicillin resistant staphylococcal infections. SN - 1532-2971 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24345778/Canine_superficial_bacterial_folliculitis:_current_understanding_of_its_etiology_diagnosis_and_treatment_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1090-0233(13)00570-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -