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Vaccines and pregnancy: past, present, and future.
Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2014 Jun; 19(3):161-9.SF

Abstract

Vaccination during pregnancy with certain vaccines can prevent morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their infants. However, previous recommendations often focused on the potential risks of vaccines to the fetus when used during pregnancy. In recent years, additional data have become available on the absence of increased risks for adverse events associated with vaccines when administered during pregnancy and on their benefits to mothers and infants. Currently two vaccines - (i) inactivated influenza, and (ii) tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) - are recommended for use by all pregnant women by the United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Here we review the history of vaccination during pregnancy, the current status of recommendations for vaccination during pregnancy in the USA, and the potential for future advances in this area, including key barriers that must be overcome to accommodate these advances.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Influenza Coordination Unit, Office of Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA. Electronic address: skr9@cdc.gov.University of Georgia, Athens, GA, USA.Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Immunization Safety Office, Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24355683

Citation

Rasmussen, Sonja A., et al. "Vaccines and Pregnancy: Past, Present, and Future." Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, vol. 19, no. 3, 2014, pp. 161-9.
Rasmussen SA, Watson AK, Kennedy ED, et al. Vaccines and pregnancy: past, present, and future. Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2014;19(3):161-9.
Rasmussen, S. A., Watson, A. K., Kennedy, E. D., Broder, K. R., & Jamieson, D. J. (2014). Vaccines and pregnancy: past, present, and future. Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine, 19(3), 161-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.siny.2013.11.014
Rasmussen SA, et al. Vaccines and Pregnancy: Past, Present, and Future. Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2014;19(3):161-9. PubMed PMID: 24355683.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vaccines and pregnancy: past, present, and future. AU - Rasmussen,Sonja A, AU - Watson,Amelia K, AU - Kennedy,Erin D, AU - Broder,Karen R, AU - Jamieson,Denise J, Y1 - 2013/12/17/ PY - 2013/12/21/entrez PY - 2013/12/21/pubmed PY - 2015/1/24/medline KW - Newborns KW - Pregnant women KW - Safety KW - Vaccine SP - 161 EP - 9 JF - Seminars in fetal & neonatal medicine JO - Semin Fetal Neonatal Med VL - 19 IS - 3 N2 - Vaccination during pregnancy with certain vaccines can prevent morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their infants. However, previous recommendations often focused on the potential risks of vaccines to the fetus when used during pregnancy. In recent years, additional data have become available on the absence of increased risks for adverse events associated with vaccines when administered during pregnancy and on their benefits to mothers and infants. Currently two vaccines - (i) inactivated influenza, and (ii) tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis (Tdap) - are recommended for use by all pregnant women by the United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Here we review the history of vaccination during pregnancy, the current status of recommendations for vaccination during pregnancy in the USA, and the potential for future advances in this area, including key barriers that must be overcome to accommodate these advances. SN - 1878-0946 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24355683/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1744-165X(13)00123-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -