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Physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP cohort.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Body mass index is known to be positively associated with an increased risk of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, yet there is there limited evidence on whether physical activity or sedentary behavior affects risk of histology- and site-specific upper gastrointestinal cancers. We used the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study to assess these exposures in relation to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA).

METHODS

Self-administered questionnaires were used to elicit physical activity and sedentary behavior exposures at various age periods. Cohort members were followed via linkage to the US Postal Service National Change of Address database, the Social Security Administration Death Master File, and the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95%CI).

RESULTS

During 4.8 million person years, there were a total of 215 incident ESCCs, 631 EAs, 453 GCAs, and 501 GNCAs for analysis. Strenuous physical activity in the last 12 months (HR(>5 times/week vs. never)=0.58, 95%CI: 0.39, 0.88) and typical physical activity and sports during ages 15-18 years (p for trend=0.01) were each inversely associated with GNCA risk. Increased sedentary behavior was inversely associated with EA (HR(5-6 hrs/day vs. <1 hr)=0.57, 95%CI: 0.36, 0.92). There was no evidence that BMI was a confounder or effect modifier of any relationship. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of these results were deemed to be statistically significant at p<0.05.

CONCLUSIONS

We find evidence for an inverse association between physical activity and GNCA risk. Associations between body mass index and adenocarcinomas of the esophagus do not appear to be related to physical activity and sedentary behavior.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

    ,

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

    ,

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

    ,

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

    ,

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

    Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America.

    Source

    PloS one 8:12 2013 pg e84805

    MeSH

    Age Factors
    Body Mass Index
    Cohort Studies
    Esophageal Neoplasms
    Humans
    Motor Activity
    Proportional Hazards Models
    Risk Factors
    Sedentary Behavior
    Stomach Neoplasms
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24367697

    Citation

    Cook, Michael B., et al. "Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in the NIH-AARP Cohort." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 12, 2013, pp. e84805.
    Cook MB, Matthews CE, Gunja MZ, et al. Physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP cohort. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(12):e84805.
    Cook, M. B., Matthews, C. E., Gunja, M. Z., Abid, Z., Freedman, N. D., & Abnet, C. C. (2013). Physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP cohort. PloS One, 8(12), pp. e84805. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0084805.
    Cook MB, et al. Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior in Relation to Esophageal and Gastric Cancers in the NIH-AARP Cohort. PLoS ONE. 2013;8(12):e84805. PubMed PMID: 24367697.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Physical activity and sedentary behavior in relation to esophageal and gastric cancers in the NIH-AARP cohort. AU - Cook,Michael B, AU - Matthews,Charles E, AU - Gunja,Munira Z, AU - Abid,Zaynah, AU - Freedman,Neal D, AU - Abnet,Christian C, Y1 - 2013/12/19/ PY - 2013/08/28/received PY - 2013/11/18/accepted PY - 2013/12/25/entrez PY - 2013/12/25/pubmed PY - 2014/7/30/medline SP - e84805 EP - e84805 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 8 IS - 12 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Body mass index is known to be positively associated with an increased risk of adenocarcinomas of the esophagus, yet there is there limited evidence on whether physical activity or sedentary behavior affects risk of histology- and site-specific upper gastrointestinal cancers. We used the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study to assess these exposures in relation to esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA), esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), gastric cardia adenocarcinoma (GCA), and gastric non-cardia adenocarcinoma (GNCA). METHODS: Self-administered questionnaires were used to elicit physical activity and sedentary behavior exposures at various age periods. Cohort members were followed via linkage to the US Postal Service National Change of Address database, the Social Security Administration Death Master File, and the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (95%CI). RESULTS: During 4.8 million person years, there were a total of 215 incident ESCCs, 631 EAs, 453 GCAs, and 501 GNCAs for analysis. Strenuous physical activity in the last 12 months (HR(>5 times/week vs. never)=0.58, 95%CI: 0.39, 0.88) and typical physical activity and sports during ages 15-18 years (p for trend=0.01) were each inversely associated with GNCA risk. Increased sedentary behavior was inversely associated with EA (HR(5-6 hrs/day vs. <1 hr)=0.57, 95%CI: 0.36, 0.92). There was no evidence that BMI was a confounder or effect modifier of any relationship. After adjustment for multiple testing, none of these results were deemed to be statistically significant at p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: We find evidence for an inverse association between physical activity and GNCA risk. Associations between body mass index and adenocarcinomas of the esophagus do not appear to be related to physical activity and sedentary behavior. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24367697/Physical_activity_and_sedentary_behavior_in_relation_to_esophageal_and_gastric_cancers_in_the_NIH_AARP_cohort_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084805 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -