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Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines.
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2014; 11(2):111-6.JO

Abstract

A comprehensive survey of respirable dust and respirable silica in Ontario gold mines was conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Labor during 1978-1979. The aim was to assess the feasibility of introducing gravimetric sampling to replace the assessment method which used konimeters, a device which gave results in terms of number of particles per cubic centimeter (ppcc) of air. The study involved both laboratory and field assessments. The field assessment involved measurement of airborne respirable dust and respirable silica at all eight operating gold mines of the time. This article describes the details of the field assessment. A total of 288 long-term (7-8 hr) personal respirable dust air samples were collected from seven occupational categories in eight gold mines. The respirable silica (α-quartz) was determined by x-ray diffraction method. The results show that during 1978-1979, the industry wide mean respirable dust was about 1 mg/m(3), and the mean respirable silica was 0.08 mg/m(3.)The mean% silica in respirable dust was 7.5%. The data set would be useful in future epidemiological and health studies, as well as in assessment of workers' compensation claims for occupational diseases such as silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and autoimmune diseases such as renal disease and rheumatoid arthritis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Family Medicine and Program in Occupational Health and Environmental Medicine, McMaster University , Hamilton , Ontario , Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Historical Article
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24369933

Citation

Verma, Dave K., et al. "Respirable Dust and Respirable Silica Exposure in Ontario Gold Mines." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, vol. 11, no. 2, 2014, pp. 111-6.
Verma DK, Rajhans GS, Malik OP, et al. Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2014;11(2):111-6.
Verma, D. K., Rajhans, G. S., Malik, O. P., & des Tombe, K. (2014). Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 11(2), 111-6. https://doi.org/10.1080/15459624.2013.843784
Verma DK, et al. Respirable Dust and Respirable Silica Exposure in Ontario Gold Mines. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2014;11(2):111-6. PubMed PMID: 24369933.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Respirable dust and respirable silica exposure in Ontario gold mines. AU - Verma,Dave K, AU - Rajhans,Gyan S, AU - Malik,Om P, AU - des Tombe,Karen, PY - 2013/12/28/entrez PY - 2013/12/29/pubmed PY - 2014/8/21/medline SP - 111 EP - 6 JF - Journal of occupational and environmental hygiene JO - J Occup Environ Hyg VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - A comprehensive survey of respirable dust and respirable silica in Ontario gold mines was conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Labor during 1978-1979. The aim was to assess the feasibility of introducing gravimetric sampling to replace the assessment method which used konimeters, a device which gave results in terms of number of particles per cubic centimeter (ppcc) of air. The study involved both laboratory and field assessments. The field assessment involved measurement of airborne respirable dust and respirable silica at all eight operating gold mines of the time. This article describes the details of the field assessment. A total of 288 long-term (7-8 hr) personal respirable dust air samples were collected from seven occupational categories in eight gold mines. The respirable silica (α-quartz) was determined by x-ray diffraction method. The results show that during 1978-1979, the industry wide mean respirable dust was about 1 mg/m(3), and the mean respirable silica was 0.08 mg/m(3.)The mean% silica in respirable dust was 7.5%. The data set would be useful in future epidemiological and health studies, as well as in assessment of workers' compensation claims for occupational diseases such as silicosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and autoimmune diseases such as renal disease and rheumatoid arthritis. SN - 1545-9632 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24369933/Respirable_dust_and_respirable_silica_exposure_in_Ontario_gold_mines_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15459624.2013.843784 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -