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OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: intestine.
Am J Transplant. 2014 Jan; 14 Suppl 1:97-111.AJ

Abstract

Advances in the medical and surgical treatments of intestinal failure have led to a decrease in the number of transplants over the past decade. In 2012, 152 candidates were added to the intestinal transplant waiting list, a new low. Of these, 64 were listed for intestine-liver transplant and 88 for intestinal transplant alone or with an organ other than liver. Historically, the most common organ transplanted with the intestine was the liver; this practice decreased substantially from a peak of 52.9% in 2007 to 30.0% in 2012. Short-gut syndrome, which encompasses a large group of diagnoses, is the most common etiology of intestinal failure. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups, from 51.0 per 100 wait-list years in 1998-1999 to 6.7 for patients listed in 2010-2012. Numbers of intestinal and intestine-liver transplants steadily decreased from 198 in 2007 to 106 in 2012. By age, intestinal transplant recipients have changed substantially; the number of adult recipients now approximately equals the number of pediatric recipients. Graft survival has improved over the past decade. Graft failure in the first 90 days after transplant occurred in 15.7% of 2011-2012 intestinal transplant recipients, compared with 21% in 2001-2002.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients, Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation, Minneapolis, MN; Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24373169

Citation

Smith, J M., et al. "OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: Intestine." American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, vol. 14 Suppl 1, 2014, pp. 97-111.
Smith JM, Skeans MA, Horslen SP, et al. OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: intestine. Am J Transplant. 2014;14 Suppl 1:97-111.
Smith, J. M., Skeans, M. A., Horslen, S. P., Edwards, E. B., Harper, A. M., Snyderf, J. J., Israni, A. K., & Kasiske, B. L. (2014). OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: intestine. American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, 14 Suppl 1, 97-111. https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.12582
Smith JM, et al. OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: Intestine. Am J Transplant. 2014;14 Suppl 1:97-111. PubMed PMID: 24373169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: intestine. AU - Smith,J M, AU - Skeans,M A, AU - Horslen,S P, AU - Edwards,E B, AU - Harper,A M, AU - Snyderf,J J, AU - Israni,A K, AU - Kasiske,B L, PY - 2013/12/31/entrez PY - 2014/1/1/pubmed PY - 2015/4/10/medline KW - Intestinal failure KW - intestinal transplant KW - liver-intestine transplant KW - waiting list SP - 97 EP - 111 JF - American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons JO - Am J Transplant VL - 14 Suppl 1 N2 - Advances in the medical and surgical treatments of intestinal failure have led to a decrease in the number of transplants over the past decade. In 2012, 152 candidates were added to the intestinal transplant waiting list, a new low. Of these, 64 were listed for intestine-liver transplant and 88 for intestinal transplant alone or with an organ other than liver. Historically, the most common organ transplanted with the intestine was the liver; this practice decreased substantially from a peak of 52.9% in 2007 to 30.0% in 2012. Short-gut syndrome, which encompasses a large group of diagnoses, is the most common etiology of intestinal failure. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups, from 51.0 per 100 wait-list years in 1998-1999 to 6.7 for patients listed in 2010-2012. Numbers of intestinal and intestine-liver transplants steadily decreased from 198 in 2007 to 106 in 2012. By age, intestinal transplant recipients have changed substantially; the number of adult recipients now approximately equals the number of pediatric recipients. Graft survival has improved over the past decade. Graft failure in the first 90 days after transplant occurred in 15.7% of 2011-2012 intestinal transplant recipients, compared with 21% in 2001-2002. SN - 1600-6143 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24373169/OPTN/SRTR_2012_Annual_Data_Report:_intestine_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ajt.12582 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -