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Thirty-two-year follow-up study of Herbst therapy: a biometric dental cast analysis.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2014 Jan; 145(1):15-27.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The aim of this study was to analyze the very long-term effects of Herbst treatment on tooth position and occlusion.

SUBJECTS

Fourteen patients from a sample of 22 with Class II Division 1 malocclusions consecutively treated with the banded Herbst appliance were reexamined 32 years after therapy.

METHODS

Dental casts were analyzed from before (T1) and after (T2) treatment, and at 6 years (T3) and 32 years (T4) after treatment.

RESULTS

Minor changes in maxillary and mandibular dental arch perimeters and arch widths were seen during treatment (T1-T2) and posttreatment (T2-T4). Mandibular incisor irregularity remained, on average, unchanged from T1 to T2 but increased continuously during the 32-year follow-up period (T2-T4). Class II molar and canine relationships were normalized in most patients from T1 to T2. During the early posttreatment period (T2-T3), there was a minor relapse; during the late posttreatment period (T3-T4), molar and canine relationships remained, on average, unchanged. Overjet and overbite were reduced to normal values in all subjects during treatment (T1-T2). After treatment (T2-T4), overjet remained, on average, unchanged, but overbite increased insignificantly.

CONCLUSIONS

Thirty-two years after Herbst therapy, overall, acceptable long-term results were seen. Stability was found in 64% of the patients for sagittal molar relationships, in 14% for sagittal canine relationships, in 86% for overjet, and in 86% for overbite. A Class II relapse seemed to be caused by an unstable interdigitation of the occluding teeth, a persisting oral habit, or an insufficient retention regimen after treatment. Most posttreatment changes occurred during the first 6 years after treatment. After the age of 20 years, only minor changes were noted. Long-term posttreatment changes in maxillary and mandibular dental arch perimeters and widths as well as in mandibular incisor irregularity seemed to be independent of treatment and a result of physiologic dentoskeletal changes throughout adulthood.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Professor and chair emeritus, Department of Orthodontics, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany. Electronic address: hans.pancherz@dentist.med.uni-giessen.de.Associate professor, Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malmö, Malmö, Sweden.Clinical assistant professor, Department of Orthodontics, University Clinics of Odontology, Public Dental Service, Gothenburg, Sweden.Associate professor, Department of Orthodontics, University Clinics of Odontology, Public Dental Service, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24373651

Citation

Pancherz, Hans, et al. "Thirty-two-year Follow-up Study of Herbst Therapy: a Biometric Dental Cast Analysis." American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, vol. 145, no. 1, 2014, pp. 15-27.
Pancherz H, Bjerklin K, Lindskog-Stokland B, et al. Thirty-two-year follow-up study of Herbst therapy: a biometric dental cast analysis. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2014;145(1):15-27.
Pancherz, H., Bjerklin, K., Lindskog-Stokland, B., & Hansen, K. (2014). Thirty-two-year follow-up study of Herbst therapy: a biometric dental cast analysis. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, 145(1), 15-27. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2013.09.012
Pancherz H, et al. Thirty-two-year Follow-up Study of Herbst Therapy: a Biometric Dental Cast Analysis. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2014;145(1):15-27. PubMed PMID: 24373651.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Thirty-two-year follow-up study of Herbst therapy: a biometric dental cast analysis. AU - Pancherz,Hans, AU - Bjerklin,Krister, AU - Lindskog-Stokland,Birgitta, AU - Hansen,Ken, PY - 2013/06/14/received PY - 2013/09/16/revised PY - 2013/09/25/accepted PY - 2013/12/31/entrez PY - 2014/1/1/pubmed PY - 2014/2/22/medline SP - 15 EP - 27 JF - American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics JO - Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop VL - 145 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to analyze the very long-term effects of Herbst treatment on tooth position and occlusion. SUBJECTS: Fourteen patients from a sample of 22 with Class II Division 1 malocclusions consecutively treated with the banded Herbst appliance were reexamined 32 years after therapy. METHODS: Dental casts were analyzed from before (T1) and after (T2) treatment, and at 6 years (T3) and 32 years (T4) after treatment. RESULTS: Minor changes in maxillary and mandibular dental arch perimeters and arch widths were seen during treatment (T1-T2) and posttreatment (T2-T4). Mandibular incisor irregularity remained, on average, unchanged from T1 to T2 but increased continuously during the 32-year follow-up period (T2-T4). Class II molar and canine relationships were normalized in most patients from T1 to T2. During the early posttreatment period (T2-T3), there was a minor relapse; during the late posttreatment period (T3-T4), molar and canine relationships remained, on average, unchanged. Overjet and overbite were reduced to normal values in all subjects during treatment (T1-T2). After treatment (T2-T4), overjet remained, on average, unchanged, but overbite increased insignificantly. CONCLUSIONS: Thirty-two years after Herbst therapy, overall, acceptable long-term results were seen. Stability was found in 64% of the patients for sagittal molar relationships, in 14% for sagittal canine relationships, in 86% for overjet, and in 86% for overbite. A Class II relapse seemed to be caused by an unstable interdigitation of the occluding teeth, a persisting oral habit, or an insufficient retention regimen after treatment. Most posttreatment changes occurred during the first 6 years after treatment. After the age of 20 years, only minor changes were noted. Long-term posttreatment changes in maxillary and mandibular dental arch perimeters and widths as well as in mandibular incisor irregularity seemed to be independent of treatment and a result of physiologic dentoskeletal changes throughout adulthood. SN - 1097-6752 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24373651/Thirty_two_year_follow_up_study_of_Herbst_therapy:_a_biometric_dental_cast_analysis_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-5406(13)00896-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -