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Maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on pregnancy outcomes.
PLoS One. 2013; 8(12):e82310.Plos

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the single and joint associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) with pregnancy outcomes in Tianjin, China.

METHODS

Between June 2009 and May 2011, health care records of 33,973 pregnant women were collected and their children were measured for birth weight and birth length. The independent and joint associations of prepregnancy BMI and GWG based on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines with the risks of pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were examined by using Logistic Regression.

RESULTS

After adjustment for all confounding factors, maternal prepregnancy BMI was positively associated with risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, preterm delivery, large-for-gestational age infant (LGA), and macrosomia, and inversely associated with risks of small-for-gestational age infant (SGA) and low birth weight. Maternal excessive GWG was associated with increased risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia, and decreased risks of preterm delivery, SGA, and low birth weight. Maternal inadequate GWG was associated with increased risks of preterm delivery and SGA, and decreased risks of LGA and macrosomia, compared with maternal adequate GWG. Women with both prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG had 2.2-5.9 folds higher risks of GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia compared with women with normal prepregnancy BMI and adequate GWG.

CONCLUSIONS

Maternal prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG were associated with greater risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, and greater infant size at birth. Health care providers should inform women to start the pregnancy with a BMI in the normal weight category and limit their GWG to the range specified for their prepregnancy BMI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China ; Chronic Disease Epidemiology Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Tianjin Women's and Children's Health Center, Tianjin, China.Departments of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, United States of America.Chronic Disease Epidemiology Laboratory, Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24376527

Citation

Li, Nan, et al. "Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain On Pregnancy Outcomes." PloS One, vol. 8, no. 12, 2013, pp. e82310.
Li N, Liu E, Guo J, et al. Maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on pregnancy outcomes. PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82310.
Li, N., Liu, E., Guo, J., Pan, L., Li, B., Wang, P., Liu, J., Wang, Y., Liu, G., Baccarelli, A. A., Hou, L., & Hu, G. (2013). Maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on pregnancy outcomes. PloS One, 8(12), e82310. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0082310
Li N, et al. Maternal Prepregnancy Body Mass Index and Gestational Weight Gain On Pregnancy Outcomes. PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82310. PubMed PMID: 24376527.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal prepregnancy body mass index and gestational weight gain on pregnancy outcomes. AU - Li,Nan, AU - Liu,Enqing, AU - Guo,Jia, AU - Pan,Lei, AU - Li,Baojuan, AU - Wang,Ping, AU - Liu,Jin, AU - Wang,Yue, AU - Liu,Gongshu, AU - Baccarelli,Andrea A, AU - Hou,Lifang, AU - Hu,Gang, Y1 - 2013/12/20/ PY - 2013/08/09/received PY - 2013/10/22/accepted PY - 2013/12/31/entrez PY - 2014/1/1/pubmed PY - 2015/3/4/medline SP - e82310 EP - e82310 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 8 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the single and joint associations of maternal prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) and gestational weight gain (GWG) with pregnancy outcomes in Tianjin, China. METHODS: Between June 2009 and May 2011, health care records of 33,973 pregnant women were collected and their children were measured for birth weight and birth length. The independent and joint associations of prepregnancy BMI and GWG based on the Institute of Medicine (IOM) guidelines with the risks of pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were examined by using Logistic Regression. RESULTS: After adjustment for all confounding factors, maternal prepregnancy BMI was positively associated with risks of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, preterm delivery, large-for-gestational age infant (LGA), and macrosomia, and inversely associated with risks of small-for-gestational age infant (SGA) and low birth weight. Maternal excessive GWG was associated with increased risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia, and decreased risks of preterm delivery, SGA, and low birth weight. Maternal inadequate GWG was associated with increased risks of preterm delivery and SGA, and decreased risks of LGA and macrosomia, compared with maternal adequate GWG. Women with both prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG had 2.2-5.9 folds higher risks of GDM, pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, LGA, and macrosomia compared with women with normal prepregnancy BMI and adequate GWG. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal prepregnancy obesity and excessive GWG were associated with greater risks of pregnancy-induced hypertension, caesarean delivery, and greater infant size at birth. Health care providers should inform women to start the pregnancy with a BMI in the normal weight category and limit their GWG to the range specified for their prepregnancy BMI. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24376527/Maternal_prepregnancy_body_mass_index_and_gestational_weight_gain_on_pregnancy_outcomes_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0082310 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -