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Tapia's Syndrome after Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery under General Anesthesia.
J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2013 Nov; 54(5):423-5.JK

Abstract

We present a case report to remind surgeons of this unusual complication that can occur in any surgery, even posterior cervical spine surgery under general anesthesia and discuss its causes, treatment methods, and the follow-up results in the literature. The peripheral Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication of anesthetic airway management. Main symptoms are hoarseness of voice and difficulty of tongue movement. Tapia's syndrome after endotracheal general anesthesia is believed to be due to pressure neuropathy of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nerve caused by the endotracheal tube. To our knowledge, no report has been published or given an explanation for Tapia's syndrome after posterior cervical spine surgery. Two patients who underwent posterior cervical surgery complained hoarseness and tongue palsy postoperatively. There is no direct anatomical relation between the operation, the vagus nerves and the hypoglossal nerves, and there is no record of displacement or malposition of the endotracheal tube. After several months, all symptoms are resolved. To avoid this problem in posterior cervical spine surgery, we suggest paying special attention to the position of the endotracheal tube to avoid excessive neck flexion before and during the positioning of the patient.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurosurgery, The Leon Wiltse Memorial Hospital, Suwon, Korea.Department of Neurosurgery, The Leon Wiltse Memorial Hospital, Suwon, Korea.Department of Biology, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA, USA.Department of Neurosurgery, The Leon Wiltse Memorial Hospital, Suwon, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24379951

Citation

Park, Chang Kyu, et al. "Tapia's Syndrome After Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery Under General Anesthesia." Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society, vol. 54, no. 5, 2013, pp. 423-5.
Park CK, Lee DC, Park CJ, et al. Tapia's Syndrome after Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery under General Anesthesia. J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2013;54(5):423-5.
Park, C. K., Lee, D. C., Park, C. J., & Hwang, J. H. (2013). Tapia's Syndrome after Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery under General Anesthesia. Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society, 54(5), 423-5. https://doi.org/10.3340/jkns.2013.54.5.423
Park CK, et al. Tapia's Syndrome After Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery Under General Anesthesia. J Korean Neurosurg Soc. 2013;54(5):423-5. PubMed PMID: 24379951.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tapia's Syndrome after Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery under General Anesthesia. AU - Park,Chang Kyu, AU - Lee,Dong Chan, AU - Park,Chan Joo, AU - Hwang,Jang Hoe, Y1 - 2013/11/30/ PY - 2013/03/25/received PY - 2013/06/07/revised PY - 2013/11/07/accepted PY - 2014/1/1/entrez PY - 2014/1/1/pubmed PY - 2014/1/1/medline KW - Hypoglossal nerve KW - Posterior cervical spine surgery KW - Tapia's syndrome KW - Vagus nerve SP - 423 EP - 5 JF - Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society JO - J Korean Neurosurg Soc VL - 54 IS - 5 N2 - We present a case report to remind surgeons of this unusual complication that can occur in any surgery, even posterior cervical spine surgery under general anesthesia and discuss its causes, treatment methods, and the follow-up results in the literature. The peripheral Tapia's syndrome is a rare complication of anesthetic airway management. Main symptoms are hoarseness of voice and difficulty of tongue movement. Tapia's syndrome after endotracheal general anesthesia is believed to be due to pressure neuropathy of the vagus nerve and the hypoglossal nerve caused by the endotracheal tube. To our knowledge, no report has been published or given an explanation for Tapia's syndrome after posterior cervical spine surgery. Two patients who underwent posterior cervical surgery complained hoarseness and tongue palsy postoperatively. There is no direct anatomical relation between the operation, the vagus nerves and the hypoglossal nerves, and there is no record of displacement or malposition of the endotracheal tube. After several months, all symptoms are resolved. To avoid this problem in posterior cervical spine surgery, we suggest paying special attention to the position of the endotracheal tube to avoid excessive neck flexion before and during the positioning of the patient. SN - 2005-3711 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24379951/Tapia's_Syndrome_after_Posterior_Cervical_Spine_Surgery_under_General_Anesthesia_ L2 - http://jkns.or.kr/journal/view.php?doi=10.3340/jkns.2013.54.5.423 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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