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The evaluation and quantification of respirable coal and silica dust concentrations: a task-based approach.
J Occup Environ Hyg. 2014; 11(6):406-14.JO

Abstract

Silicosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis are serious occupational respiratory diseases associated with the coal mining industry and the inhalation of respirable dusts containing crystalline silica. The purpose of this study (funded by the Mine Health and Safety Council of South Africa) was to evaluate the individual contributions of underground coal mining tasks to the respirable dust and respirable silica dust concentrations in an underground section by sampling the respirable dust concentrations at the intake and return of each task. The identified tasks were continuous miner (CM) cutting, construction, transfer of coal, tipping, and roof bolting. The respirable dust-generating hierarchy of the tasks from highest to lowest was: transfer of coal > CM right cutting > CM left cutting > CM face cutting > construction > roof bolting > tipping; and for respirable silica dust: CM left cutting > construction > transfer of coal > CM right cutting. Personal exposure levels were determined by sampling the exposures of workers performing tasks in the section. Respirable dust concentrations and low concentrations of respirable silica dust were found at the intake air side of the section, indicating that air entering the section is already contaminated. The hierarchy for personal respirable dust exposures was as follows, from highest to lowest: CM operator > cable handler > miner > roof bolt operator > shuttle car operator, and for respirable silica dust: shuttle car operator > CM operator > cable handler > roof bolt operator > miner. Dust control methods to lower exposures should include revision of the position of workers with regard to the task performed, positioning of the tasks with regard to the CM cutting, and proper use of the line curtains to direct ventilation appropriately. The correct use of respiratory protection should also be encouraged.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a CSIR Centre for Mining Innovation , Auckland Park , South Africa.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24380473

Citation

Grové, T, et al. "The Evaluation and Quantification of Respirable Coal and Silica Dust Concentrations: a Task-based Approach." Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, vol. 11, no. 6, 2014, pp. 406-14.
Grové T, Van Dyk T, Franken A, et al. The evaluation and quantification of respirable coal and silica dust concentrations: a task-based approach. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2014;11(6):406-14.
Grové, T., Van Dyk, T., Franken, A., & Du Plessis, J. (2014). The evaluation and quantification of respirable coal and silica dust concentrations: a task-based approach. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 11(6), 406-14. https://doi.org/10.1080/15459624.2013.877140
Grové T, et al. The Evaluation and Quantification of Respirable Coal and Silica Dust Concentrations: a Task-based Approach. J Occup Environ Hyg. 2014;11(6):406-14. PubMed PMID: 24380473.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The evaluation and quantification of respirable coal and silica dust concentrations: a task-based approach. AU - Grové,T, AU - Van Dyk,T, AU - Franken,A, AU - Du Plessis,J, PY - 2014/1/2/entrez PY - 2014/1/2/pubmed PY - 2015/3/4/medline KW - Mine Health and Safety Council KW - Respirable dust KW - coal mining KW - coal mining activities KW - respirable silica dust KW - task-based exposure SP - 406 EP - 14 JF - Journal of occupational and environmental hygiene JO - J Occup Environ Hyg VL - 11 IS - 6 N2 - Silicosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis are serious occupational respiratory diseases associated with the coal mining industry and the inhalation of respirable dusts containing crystalline silica. The purpose of this study (funded by the Mine Health and Safety Council of South Africa) was to evaluate the individual contributions of underground coal mining tasks to the respirable dust and respirable silica dust concentrations in an underground section by sampling the respirable dust concentrations at the intake and return of each task. The identified tasks were continuous miner (CM) cutting, construction, transfer of coal, tipping, and roof bolting. The respirable dust-generating hierarchy of the tasks from highest to lowest was: transfer of coal > CM right cutting > CM left cutting > CM face cutting > construction > roof bolting > tipping; and for respirable silica dust: CM left cutting > construction > transfer of coal > CM right cutting. Personal exposure levels were determined by sampling the exposures of workers performing tasks in the section. Respirable dust concentrations and low concentrations of respirable silica dust were found at the intake air side of the section, indicating that air entering the section is already contaminated. The hierarchy for personal respirable dust exposures was as follows, from highest to lowest: CM operator > cable handler > miner > roof bolt operator > shuttle car operator, and for respirable silica dust: shuttle car operator > CM operator > cable handler > roof bolt operator > miner. Dust control methods to lower exposures should include revision of the position of workers with regard to the task performed, positioning of the tasks with regard to the CM cutting, and proper use of the line curtains to direct ventilation appropriately. The correct use of respiratory protection should also be encouraged. SN - 1545-9632 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24380473/The_evaluation_and_quantification_of_respirable_coal_and_silica_dust_concentrations:_a_task_based_approach_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15459624.2013.877140 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -