Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Individuals with exceptional longevity manifest a delayed association between vitamin D insufficiency and cognitive impairment.
J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014 Jan; 62(1):153-8.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To define vitamin D levels and their association with cognition in subjects with exceptional longevity.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional.

SETTING

Community and long-term care facilities.

PARTICIPANTS

Ashkenazi Jewish subjects (n = 253) with exceptional longevity, with comparison made to the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) participants aged 70 and older.

MEASUREMENTS

Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and clock drawing test (CDT: command and copy).

RESULTS

The median age of the Ashkenazi subjects was 97 (interquartile range (IQR) 95-104). Age-associated rise in the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency, defined as a serum vitamin D level of less than 30 ng/mL, was noted in NHANES III (P = .001). In the Ashkenazi group with longevity, the rate of vitamin D insufficiency was comparable with that of the NHANES III participants, who were up to 25 years younger. In the cohort with exceptional longevity, 49% demonstrated cognitive impairment as assessed according to MMSE score (impaired cognition, median 9.5 IQR 0-24); normal cognition, median 29 (IQR 18-30) P < .001). Vitamin D insufficiency was more prevalent in those with impaired cognition, defined according to the MMSE (71.8% vs 57.7%, P = .02) and the CDT copy (84.6% vs. 50.6%, P = .02), than in those with normal cognition. This association remained significant after multivariable adjustment in logistic regression models for cognitive assessments made using the MMSE (odds ratio (OR) = 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-9.29, P = .03) and the CDT copy (OR = 8.96, 95% CI = 1.08-74.69, P = .04).

CONCLUSION

Higher vitamin D levels may be a marker of delayed aging, because they are associated with better cognitive function in people achieving exceptional longevity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York; Institute for Aging Research, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24383816

Citation

Milman, Sofiya, et al. "Individuals With Exceptional Longevity Manifest a Delayed Association Between Vitamin D Insufficiency and Cognitive Impairment." Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, vol. 62, no. 1, 2014, pp. 153-8.
Milman S, Schulder-Katz M, Deluty J, et al. Individuals with exceptional longevity manifest a delayed association between vitamin D insufficiency and cognitive impairment. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014;62(1):153-8.
Milman, S., Schulder-Katz, M., Deluty, J., Zimmerman, M. E., Crandall, J. P., Barzilai, N., Melamed, M. L., & Atzmon, G. (2014). Individuals with exceptional longevity manifest a delayed association between vitamin D insufficiency and cognitive impairment. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 62(1), 153-8. https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.12601
Milman S, et al. Individuals With Exceptional Longevity Manifest a Delayed Association Between Vitamin D Insufficiency and Cognitive Impairment. J Am Geriatr Soc. 2014;62(1):153-8. PubMed PMID: 24383816.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Individuals with exceptional longevity manifest a delayed association between vitamin D insufficiency and cognitive impairment. AU - Milman,Sofiya, AU - Schulder-Katz,Micol, AU - Deluty,Jennifer, AU - Zimmerman,Molly E, AU - Crandall,Jill P, AU - Barzilai,Nir, AU - Melamed,Michal L, AU - Atzmon,Gil, Y1 - 2014/01/02/ PY - 2014/1/4/entrez PY - 2014/1/5/pubmed PY - 2014/9/13/medline KW - cognitive function KW - exceptional longevity KW - vitamin D SP - 153 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the American Geriatrics Society JO - J Am Geriatr Soc VL - 62 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To define vitamin D levels and their association with cognition in subjects with exceptional longevity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Community and long-term care facilities. PARTICIPANTS: Ashkenazi Jewish subjects (n = 253) with exceptional longevity, with comparison made to the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) participants aged 70 and older. MEASUREMENTS: Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were measured using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Cognitive function was assessed using the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and clock drawing test (CDT: command and copy). RESULTS: The median age of the Ashkenazi subjects was 97 (interquartile range (IQR) 95-104). Age-associated rise in the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency, defined as a serum vitamin D level of less than 30 ng/mL, was noted in NHANES III (P = .001). In the Ashkenazi group with longevity, the rate of vitamin D insufficiency was comparable with that of the NHANES III participants, who were up to 25 years younger. In the cohort with exceptional longevity, 49% demonstrated cognitive impairment as assessed according to MMSE score (impaired cognition, median 9.5 IQR 0-24); normal cognition, median 29 (IQR 18-30) P < .001). Vitamin D insufficiency was more prevalent in those with impaired cognition, defined according to the MMSE (71.8% vs 57.7%, P = .02) and the CDT copy (84.6% vs. 50.6%, P = .02), than in those with normal cognition. This association remained significant after multivariable adjustment in logistic regression models for cognitive assessments made using the MMSE (odds ratio (OR) = 3.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.1-9.29, P = .03) and the CDT copy (OR = 8.96, 95% CI = 1.08-74.69, P = .04). CONCLUSION: Higher vitamin D levels may be a marker of delayed aging, because they are associated with better cognitive function in people achieving exceptional longevity. SN - 1532-5415 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24383816/Individuals_with_exceptional_longevity_manifest_a_delayed_association_between_vitamin_D_insufficiency_and_cognitive_impairment_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jgs.12601 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -