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Clinical experience with THC:CBD oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis-related spasticity.

Abstract

This detailed medical charts' data collection study conducted at a multiple sclerosis (MS) clinic in Germany evaluated the effectiveness of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray in patients with resistant MS spasticity. Over a 15-month timeframe, THC:CBD spray was initiated in 166 patients. Mean follow-up was 9 months. In all, 120 patients remained on treatment for a response rate of 72%. THC:CBD spray was used as add-on therapy in 95 patients and as monotherapy in 25 patients to achieve best-possible therapeutic results. Among responders, the mean spasticity 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) score decreased by 57%, from 7.0 before treatment to 3.0 within 10 days of starting THC:CBD spray. The mean dosage was 4 sprays/day. Most patients who withdrew from treatment (40/46) had been receiving THC:CBD spray for less than 60 days. Main reasons for treatment discontinuation were: adverse drug reactions, mainly dizziness, fatigue and oral discomfort (23 patients; 13.9%); lack of efficacy (14 patients; 8.4%); or need for a baclofen pump (9 patients; 5.4%). No new safety signals were noted with THC:CBD spray during the evaluation period. In this routine clinical practice setting at an MS clinic in Germany, THC:CBD spray was effective and well tolerated as add-on therapy or as monotherapy in a relevant proportion of patients with resistant MS spasticity.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Marianne Strauss Klinik , Berg , Germany.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Cannabidiol
    Disability Evaluation
    Dronabinol
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Multiple Sclerosis
    Muscle Spasticity
    Retrospective Studies
    Treatment Outcome

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    24392812

    Citation

    Koehler, Jürgen, et al. "Clinical Experience With THC:CBD Oromucosal Spray in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis-related Spasticity." The International Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 124, no. 9, 2014, pp. 652-6.
    Koehler J, Feneberg W, Meier M, et al. Clinical experience with THC:CBD oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis-related spasticity. Int J Neurosci. 2014;124(9):652-6.
    Koehler, J., Feneberg, W., Meier, M., & Pöllmann, W. (2014). Clinical experience with THC:CBD oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis-related spasticity. The International Journal of Neuroscience, 124(9), pp. 652-6. doi:10.3109/00207454.2013.877460.
    Koehler J, et al. Clinical Experience With THC:CBD Oromucosal Spray in Patients With Multiple Sclerosis-related Spasticity. Int J Neurosci. 2014;124(9):652-6. PubMed PMID: 24392812.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Clinical experience with THC:CBD oromucosal spray in patients with multiple sclerosis-related spasticity. AU - Koehler,Jürgen, AU - Feneberg,Wolfgang, AU - Meier,Martin, AU - Pöllmann,Walter, Y1 - 2014/01/23/ PY - 2014/1/8/entrez PY - 2014/1/8/pubmed PY - 2015/4/18/medline KW - Germany KW - THC:CBD oromucosal spray KW - add-on therapy KW - monotherapy KW - multiple sclerosis KW - spasticity SP - 652 EP - 6 JF - The International journal of neuroscience JO - Int. J. Neurosci. VL - 124 IS - 9 N2 - This detailed medical charts' data collection study conducted at a multiple sclerosis (MS) clinic in Germany evaluated the effectiveness of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/cannabidiol (CBD) oromucosal spray in patients with resistant MS spasticity. Over a 15-month timeframe, THC:CBD spray was initiated in 166 patients. Mean follow-up was 9 months. In all, 120 patients remained on treatment for a response rate of 72%. THC:CBD spray was used as add-on therapy in 95 patients and as monotherapy in 25 patients to achieve best-possible therapeutic results. Among responders, the mean spasticity 0-10 numerical rating scale (NRS) score decreased by 57%, from 7.0 before treatment to 3.0 within 10 days of starting THC:CBD spray. The mean dosage was 4 sprays/day. Most patients who withdrew from treatment (40/46) had been receiving THC:CBD spray for less than 60 days. Main reasons for treatment discontinuation were: adverse drug reactions, mainly dizziness, fatigue and oral discomfort (23 patients; 13.9%); lack of efficacy (14 patients; 8.4%); or need for a baclofen pump (9 patients; 5.4%). No new safety signals were noted with THC:CBD spray during the evaluation period. In this routine clinical practice setting at an MS clinic in Germany, THC:CBD spray was effective and well tolerated as add-on therapy or as monotherapy in a relevant proportion of patients with resistant MS spasticity. SN - 1563-5279 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24392812/Clinical_experience_with_THC:CBD_oromucosal_spray_in_patients_with_multiple_sclerosis_related_spasticity_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/00207454.2013.877460 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -