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Differences in nutritional status between vegans, vegetarians and omnivores.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 1995 Jun; 4(2):228-32.AP

Abstract

Well planned vegetarian diets effectively meet Recommended Dietary Allowances and are a 'healthy' alternative to meat eating. Lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets have similar nutrient composition to omnivore diets. Vegan diets may be low in vitamin B 12. The fat content of the vegan diet is significantly lower and the polyunsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio higher than in the omnivore diet. The fibre content of the vegan diet is about twice that of the lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet which is about three times that of the omnivore diet. Protein and essential amino acid content of the vegan diet is adequate. Protein intake of vegans is lower than that in omnivores. Blood lipoprotein changes due to intervention with a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet are favourable regarding coronary artery disease risk. Infants and children have special needs. Full discussion of the effect of vegetarianism on child growth is beyond the scope of this report. Several dietary guidelines are given; choosing a wide variety of foods is recommended.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24394331

Citation

Crockart, H M.. "Differences in Nutritional Status Between Vegans, Vegetarians and Omnivores." Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 4, no. 2, 1995, pp. 228-32.
Crockart HM. Differences in nutritional status between vegans, vegetarians and omnivores. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 1995;4(2):228-32.
Crockart, H. M. (1995). Differences in nutritional status between vegans, vegetarians and omnivores. Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 4(2), 228-32.
Crockart HM. Differences in Nutritional Status Between Vegans, Vegetarians and Omnivores. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 1995;4(2):228-32. PubMed PMID: 24394331.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in nutritional status between vegans, vegetarians and omnivores. A1 - Crockart,H M, PY - 2014/1/8/entrez PY - 1995/6/1/pubmed PY - 1995/6/1/medline SP - 228 EP - 32 JF - Asia Pacific journal of clinical nutrition JO - Asia Pac J Clin Nutr VL - 4 IS - 2 N2 - Well planned vegetarian diets effectively meet Recommended Dietary Allowances and are a 'healthy' alternative to meat eating. Lacto-ovo-vegetarian diets have similar nutrient composition to omnivore diets. Vegan diets may be low in vitamin B 12. The fat content of the vegan diet is significantly lower and the polyunsaturated:saturated fatty acid ratio higher than in the omnivore diet. The fibre content of the vegan diet is about twice that of the lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet which is about three times that of the omnivore diet. Protein and essential amino acid content of the vegan diet is adequate. Protein intake of vegans is lower than that in omnivores. Blood lipoprotein changes due to intervention with a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet are favourable regarding coronary artery disease risk. Infants and children have special needs. Full discussion of the effect of vegetarianism on child growth is beyond the scope of this report. Several dietary guidelines are given; choosing a wide variety of foods is recommended. SN - 0964-7058 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24394331/Differences_in_nutritional_status_between_vegans_vegetarians_and_omnivores_ L2 - http://apjcn.nhri.org.tw/server/APJCN/4/2/228.pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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