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Human urinary excretion of non-persistent environmental chemicals: an overview of Danish data collected between 2006 and 2012.
Reproduction. 2014; 147(4):555-65.R

Abstract

Several non-persistent industrial chemicals have shown endocrine disrupting effects in animal studies and are suspected to be involved in human reproductive disorders. Among the non-persistent chemicals that have been discussed intensively during the past years are phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan (TCS), and parabens because of their anti-androgenic and/or estrogenic effects. Phthalates are plasticizers used in numerous industrial products. Bisphenol A is the main component of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Parabens and TCS are antimicrobial preservatives and other phenols such as benzophenone-3 (BP-3) act as a UV-screener, while chlorophenols and phenyl phenols are used as pesticides and fungicides in agriculture. In spite of the widespread use of industrial chemicals, knowledge of exposure sources and human biomonitoring studies among different segments of the population is very limited. In Denmark, we have no survey programs for non-persistent environmental chemicals, unlike some countries such as the USA (NHANES) and Germany (GerES). However, we have analyzed the excretion of seven parabens, nine phenols, and the metabolites of eight different phthalates in urine samples collected over the past 6 years from four Danish cohorts. Here, we present biomonitoring data on more than 3600 Danish children, adolescents, young men, and pregnant women from the general population. Our study shows that nearly all Danes were exposed to the six most common phthalates, to BPA, TCS, and BP-3, and to at least two of the parabens. The exposure to other non-persistent chemicals was also widespread. Our data indicate decreasing excretion of two common phthalates (di-n-butyl phthalate and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate) over time.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Growth and Reproduction, GR 5064, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24395915

Citation

Frederiksen, Hanne, et al. "Human Urinary Excretion of Non-persistent Environmental Chemicals: an Overview of Danish Data Collected Between 2006 and 2012." Reproduction (Cambridge, England), vol. 147, no. 4, 2014, pp. 555-65.
Frederiksen H, Jensen TK, Jørgensen N, et al. Human urinary excretion of non-persistent environmental chemicals: an overview of Danish data collected between 2006 and 2012. Reproduction. 2014;147(4):555-65.
Frederiksen, H., Jensen, T. K., Jørgensen, N., Kyhl, H. B., Husby, S., Skakkebæk, N. E., Main, K. M., Juul, A., & Andersson, A. M. (2014). Human urinary excretion of non-persistent environmental chemicals: an overview of Danish data collected between 2006 and 2012. Reproduction (Cambridge, England), 147(4), 555-65. https://doi.org/10.1530/REP-13-0522
Frederiksen H, et al. Human Urinary Excretion of Non-persistent Environmental Chemicals: an Overview of Danish Data Collected Between 2006 and 2012. Reproduction. 2014;147(4):555-65. PubMed PMID: 24395915.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human urinary excretion of non-persistent environmental chemicals: an overview of Danish data collected between 2006 and 2012. AU - Frederiksen,Hanne, AU - Jensen,Tina Kold, AU - Jørgensen,Niels, AU - Kyhl,Henriette Boye, AU - Husby,Steffen, AU - Skakkebæk,Niels E, AU - Main,Katharina M, AU - Juul,Anders, AU - Andersson,Anna-Maria, Y1 - 2014/03/04/ PY - 2014/1/8/entrez PY - 2014/1/8/pubmed PY - 2015/1/16/medline SP - 555 EP - 65 JF - Reproduction (Cambridge, England) JO - Reproduction VL - 147 IS - 4 N2 - Several non-persistent industrial chemicals have shown endocrine disrupting effects in animal studies and are suspected to be involved in human reproductive disorders. Among the non-persistent chemicals that have been discussed intensively during the past years are phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), triclosan (TCS), and parabens because of their anti-androgenic and/or estrogenic effects. Phthalates are plasticizers used in numerous industrial products. Bisphenol A is the main component of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Parabens and TCS are antimicrobial preservatives and other phenols such as benzophenone-3 (BP-3) act as a UV-screener, while chlorophenols and phenyl phenols are used as pesticides and fungicides in agriculture. In spite of the widespread use of industrial chemicals, knowledge of exposure sources and human biomonitoring studies among different segments of the population is very limited. In Denmark, we have no survey programs for non-persistent environmental chemicals, unlike some countries such as the USA (NHANES) and Germany (GerES). However, we have analyzed the excretion of seven parabens, nine phenols, and the metabolites of eight different phthalates in urine samples collected over the past 6 years from four Danish cohorts. Here, we present biomonitoring data on more than 3600 Danish children, adolescents, young men, and pregnant women from the general population. Our study shows that nearly all Danes were exposed to the six most common phthalates, to BPA, TCS, and BP-3, and to at least two of the parabens. The exposure to other non-persistent chemicals was also widespread. Our data indicate decreasing excretion of two common phthalates (di-n-butyl phthalate and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate) over time. SN - 1741-7899 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24395915/Human_urinary_excretion_of_non_persistent_environmental_chemicals:_an_overview_of_Danish_data_collected_between_2006_and_2012_ L2 - https://rep.bioscientifica.com/doi/10.1530/REP-13-0522 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -