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Tree nuts are inversely associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity: the Adventist health study-2.
PLoS One. 2014; 9(1):e85133.Plos

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the relationships of nut consumption, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and obesity in the Adventist Health Study-2, a relatively healthy population with a wide range of nut intake.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS

Cross-sectional analysis was conducted on clinical, dietary, anthropometric, and demographic data of 803 adults. MetS was defined according to the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute diagnostic criteria. We assessed intake of total nuts, tree nuts and peanuts, and also classified subjects into low tree nut/low peanut (LT/LP), low tree/high peanut (LT/HP), high tree nut/high peanut (HT/HP), and high tree/low peanut (HT/LP) consumers. Odds ratios were estimated using multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS

32% of subjects had MetS. Compared to LT/LP consumers, obesity was lower in LT/HP (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.53, 1.48), HT/HP (OR = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.40, 0.99) and HT/LP (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.34, 0.88) consumers, p for trend = 0.006. For MetS, odds ratios (95% CI) were 0.77 (0.47, 1.28), 0.65 (0.42, 1.00) and 0.68 (0.43, 1.07), respectively (p for trend = 0.056). Frequency of nut intake (once/week) had significant inverse associations with MetS (3% less for tree nuts and 2% less for total nuts) and obesity (7% less for tree nuts and 3% less for total nuts).

CONCLUSIONS

Tree nuts appear to have strong inverse association with obesity, and favorable though weaker association with MetS independent of demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America ; Adventist Health Studies, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America.Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America.Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America.Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America ; Adventist Health Studies, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America.Department of Nutrition, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America ; Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, California, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24416351

Citation

Jaceldo-Siegl, Karen, et al. "Tree Nuts Are Inversely Associated With Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: the Adventist Health Study-2." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 1, 2014, pp. e85133.
Jaceldo-Siegl K, Haddad E, Oda K, et al. Tree nuts are inversely associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity: the Adventist health study-2. PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e85133.
Jaceldo-Siegl, K., Haddad, E., Oda, K., Fraser, G. E., & Sabaté, J. (2014). Tree nuts are inversely associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity: the Adventist health study-2. PloS One, 9(1), e85133. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0085133
Jaceldo-Siegl K, et al. Tree Nuts Are Inversely Associated With Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity: the Adventist Health Study-2. PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e85133. PubMed PMID: 24416351.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Tree nuts are inversely associated with metabolic syndrome and obesity: the Adventist health study-2. AU - Jaceldo-Siegl,Karen, AU - Haddad,Ella, AU - Oda,Keiji, AU - Fraser,Gary E, AU - Sabaté,Joan, Y1 - 2014/01/08/ PY - 2013/07/24/received PY - 2013/11/24/accepted PY - 2014/1/14/entrez PY - 2014/1/15/pubmed PY - 2014/9/3/medline SP - e85133 EP - e85133 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationships of nut consumption, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and obesity in the Adventist Health Study-2, a relatively healthy population with a wide range of nut intake. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis was conducted on clinical, dietary, anthropometric, and demographic data of 803 adults. MetS was defined according to the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute diagnostic criteria. We assessed intake of total nuts, tree nuts and peanuts, and also classified subjects into low tree nut/low peanut (LT/LP), low tree/high peanut (LT/HP), high tree nut/high peanut (HT/HP), and high tree/low peanut (HT/LP) consumers. Odds ratios were estimated using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: 32% of subjects had MetS. Compared to LT/LP consumers, obesity was lower in LT/HP (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.53, 1.48), HT/HP (OR = 0.63; 95% CI = 0.40, 0.99) and HT/LP (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.34, 0.88) consumers, p for trend = 0.006. For MetS, odds ratios (95% CI) were 0.77 (0.47, 1.28), 0.65 (0.42, 1.00) and 0.68 (0.43, 1.07), respectively (p for trend = 0.056). Frequency of nut intake (once/week) had significant inverse associations with MetS (3% less for tree nuts and 2% less for total nuts) and obesity (7% less for tree nuts and 3% less for total nuts). CONCLUSIONS: Tree nuts appear to have strong inverse association with obesity, and favorable though weaker association with MetS independent of demographic, lifestyle and dietary factors. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24416351/Tree_nuts_are_inversely_associated_with_metabolic_syndrome_and_obesity:_the_Adventist_health_study_2_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0085133 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -