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Medication Discrepancies During Transitions of Care: A Comparison Study.
J Healthc Qual 2015 Nov-Dec; 37(6):325-32JH

Abstract

PURPOSE

Concerns surround discontinuity of care and poor communication during transitions of care between inpatient and outpatient settings. This study was designed to examine the differences in medication discrepancies during these transitions between an outpatient clinic with admitting privileges (PCP-AD) and another without admitting privileges (PCP-NOAD).

METHODS

Retrospective, chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between January and July 2009, who stated their primary care provider (PCP) was from either one of the outpatient clinics. Charts were evaluated for medication discrepancies on admission and discharge and follow-up with PCP after discharge.

RESULTS

On both admission and discharge, PCP-AD had a rate of unacceptable discrepancies less than that of PCP-NOAD, 63.4% versus 90.3% (p < .001) and 44.9% versus 84.1% (p < .001) respectively. Patients prescribed more than 10 medications were more likely to have a medication discrepancy compared with those on fewer medications (p = .003). Additionally, 85% of patients from PCP-AD followed up after discharge compared with 62.7% from PCP-NOAD (p < .001).

CONCLUSIONS

The differences between the two groups in medication discrepancies and follow-up are suggestive of increased continuity of care with fewer discrepancies when PCPs are directly involved in inpatient care. A comprehensive and accurate medication history is imperative regardless of practice model.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24417581

Citation

Trompeter, Jessica M., et al. "Medication Discrepancies During Transitions of Care: a Comparison Study." Journal for Healthcare Quality : Official Publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality, vol. 37, no. 6, 2015, pp. 325-32.
Trompeter JM, McMillan AN, Rager ML, et al. Medication Discrepancies During Transitions of Care: A Comparison Study. J Healthc Qual. 2015;37(6):325-32.
Trompeter, J. M., McMillan, A. N., Rager, M. L., & Fox, J. R. (2015). Medication Discrepancies During Transitions of Care: A Comparison Study. Journal for Healthcare Quality : Official Publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality, 37(6), pp. 325-32. doi:10.1111/jhq.12061.
Trompeter JM, et al. Medication Discrepancies During Transitions of Care: a Comparison Study. J Healthc Qual. 2015;37(6):325-32. PubMed PMID: 24417581.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Medication Discrepancies During Transitions of Care: A Comparison Study. AU - Trompeter,Jessica M, AU - McMillan,Ashlee N, AU - Rager,Michelle L, AU - Fox,Jeremy R, PY - 2014/1/15/entrez PY - 2014/1/15/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline SP - 325 EP - 32 JF - Journal for healthcare quality : official publication of the National Association for Healthcare Quality JO - J Healthc Qual VL - 37 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: Concerns surround discontinuity of care and poor communication during transitions of care between inpatient and outpatient settings. This study was designed to examine the differences in medication discrepancies during these transitions between an outpatient clinic with admitting privileges (PCP-AD) and another without admitting privileges (PCP-NOAD). METHODS: Retrospective, chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between January and July 2009, who stated their primary care provider (PCP) was from either one of the outpatient clinics. Charts were evaluated for medication discrepancies on admission and discharge and follow-up with PCP after discharge. RESULTS: On both admission and discharge, PCP-AD had a rate of unacceptable discrepancies less than that of PCP-NOAD, 63.4% versus 90.3% (p < .001) and 44.9% versus 84.1% (p < .001) respectively. Patients prescribed more than 10 medications were more likely to have a medication discrepancy compared with those on fewer medications (p = .003). Additionally, 85% of patients from PCP-AD followed up after discharge compared with 62.7% from PCP-NOAD (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The differences between the two groups in medication discrepancies and follow-up are suggestive of increased continuity of care with fewer discrepancies when PCPs are directly involved in inpatient care. A comprehensive and accurate medication history is imperative regardless of practice model. SN - 1945-1474 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24417581/Medication_Discrepancies_During_Transitions_of_Care:_A_Comparison_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jhq.12061 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -