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Intake of milk, but not total dairy, yogurt, or cheese, is negatively associated with the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents.
Nutr Res. 2014 Jan; 34(1):48-57.NR

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have reported an inverse association between dairy product consumption and cardiometabolic risk factors in adults, but this relation is relatively unexplored in adolescents. We hypothesized that a higher dairy product intake is associated with lower cardiometabolic risk factor clustering in adolescents. To test this hypothesis, a cross-sectional study was conducted with 494 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years from the Azorean Archipelago, Portugal. We measured fasting glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, body fat, and cardiorespiratory fitness. We also calculated homeostatic model assessment and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. For each one of these variables, a z score was computed using age and sex. A cardiometabolic risk score (CMRS) was constructed by summing up the z scores of all individual risk factors. High risk was considered to exist when an individual had at least 1 SD from this score. Diet was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire, and the intake of total dairy (included milk, yogurt, and cheese), milk, yogurt, and cheese was categorized as low (equal to or below the median of the total sample) or "appropriate" (above the median of the total sample).The association between dairy product intake and CMRS was evaluated using separate logistic regression, and the results were adjusted for confounders. Adolescents with high milk intake had lower CMRS, compared with those with low intake (10.6% vs 18.1%, P = .018). Adolescents with appropriate milk intake were less likely to have high CMRS than those with low milk intake (odds ratio, 0.531; 95% confidence interval, 0.302-0.931). No association was found between CMRS and total dairy, yogurt, and cheese intake. Only milk intake seems to be inversely related to CMRS in adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal. Electronic address: sandramrabreu@fade.up.pt.Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal; Faculty of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Porto, Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal.Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal.Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal.Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal.Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal; Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Technology of Porto, Polytechnic Institute of Porto, Vila Nova de Gaia, Portugal.Research Centre in Physical Activity, Health and Leisure, Faculty of Sport, University of Porto, 91-4200 Porto, Portugal; Maia Institute of Higher Education, Maia, Portugal.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24418246

Citation

Abreu, Sandra, et al. "Intake of Milk, but Not Total Dairy, Yogurt, or Cheese, Is Negatively Associated With the Clustering of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adolescents." Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), vol. 34, no. 1, 2014, pp. 48-57.
Abreu S, Moreira P, Moreira C, et al. Intake of milk, but not total dairy, yogurt, or cheese, is negatively associated with the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents. Nutr Res. 2014;34(1):48-57.
Abreu, S., Moreira, P., Moreira, C., Mota, J., Moreira-Silva, I., Santos, P. C., & Santos, R. (2014). Intake of milk, but not total dairy, yogurt, or cheese, is negatively associated with the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents. Nutrition Research (New York, N.Y.), 34(1), 48-57. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nutres.2013.10.008
Abreu S, et al. Intake of Milk, but Not Total Dairy, Yogurt, or Cheese, Is Negatively Associated With the Clustering of Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Adolescents. Nutr Res. 2014;34(1):48-57. PubMed PMID: 24418246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intake of milk, but not total dairy, yogurt, or cheese, is negatively associated with the clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors in adolescents. AU - Abreu,Sandra, AU - Moreira,Pedro, AU - Moreira,Carla, AU - Mota,Jorge, AU - Moreira-Silva,Isabel, AU - Santos,Paula-Clara, AU - Santos,Rute, Y1 - 2013/10/24/ PY - 2013/08/02/received PY - 2013/10/13/revised PY - 2013/10/16/accepted PY - 2014/1/15/entrez PY - 2014/1/15/pubmed PY - 2014/9/3/medline KW - Adolescents KW - BMI KW - BP KW - CI KW - CMRS KW - CRF KW - Cardiometabolic risk KW - Cross-sectional study KW - Dairy product KW - FFQ KW - HDL-c KW - HOMA KW - MetS KW - Milk KW - OR KW - SES KW - TC KW - TG KW - blood pressure KW - body mass index KW - cardiometabolic risk score KW - cardiorespiratory fitness KW - confidence interval KW - food frequency questionnaire KW - high-density lipoprotein cholesterol KW - homeostatic model assessment KW - metabolic syndrome KW - odds ratio KW - socioeconomic status KW - total cholesterol KW - triglyceride SP - 48 EP - 57 JF - Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.) JO - Nutr Res VL - 34 IS - 1 N2 - Epidemiologic studies have reported an inverse association between dairy product consumption and cardiometabolic risk factors in adults, but this relation is relatively unexplored in adolescents. We hypothesized that a higher dairy product intake is associated with lower cardiometabolic risk factor clustering in adolescents. To test this hypothesis, a cross-sectional study was conducted with 494 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years from the Azorean Archipelago, Portugal. We measured fasting glucose, insulin, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, systolic blood pressure, body fat, and cardiorespiratory fitness. We also calculated homeostatic model assessment and total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio. For each one of these variables, a z score was computed using age and sex. A cardiometabolic risk score (CMRS) was constructed by summing up the z scores of all individual risk factors. High risk was considered to exist when an individual had at least 1 SD from this score. Diet was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire, and the intake of total dairy (included milk, yogurt, and cheese), milk, yogurt, and cheese was categorized as low (equal to or below the median of the total sample) or "appropriate" (above the median of the total sample).The association between dairy product intake and CMRS was evaluated using separate logistic regression, and the results were adjusted for confounders. Adolescents with high milk intake had lower CMRS, compared with those with low intake (10.6% vs 18.1%, P = .018). Adolescents with appropriate milk intake were less likely to have high CMRS than those with low milk intake (odds ratio, 0.531; 95% confidence interval, 0.302-0.931). No association was found between CMRS and total dairy, yogurt, and cheese intake. Only milk intake seems to be inversely related to CMRS in adolescents. SN - 1879-0739 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24418246/Intake_of_milk_but_not_total_dairy_yogurt_or_cheese_is_negatively_associated_with_the_clustering_of_cardiometabolic_risk_factors_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0271-5317(13)00251-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -