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Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2014 Mar; 99(3):609-16.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

In the past decade, the United States has seen declining energy intakes and plateauing obesity levels.

OBJECTIVE

We examined whether these observed trends suggest a longer-term shift in dietary and health behavior that is independent of adverse economic conditions.

DESIGN

We used nationally representative cross-sectional surveys on intake and longitudinal household food purchase data along with random-effects models to address this question. Data included individuals in NHANES 2003-2004 to 2009-2010 (children: n = 13,422; adults: n = 10,791) and households from the 2000-2011 Nielsen Homescan Panel (households with children: n = 57,298; households with adults only: n = 108,932).

RESULTS

In both data sets, we showed that children decreased their calories the most. Even after we controlled for important socioeconomic factors, caloric purchases fell significantly from 2003 to 2011 (P < 0.001), particularly for households with children. The Great Recession was associated with small increases in caloric purchases, in which a 1-percentage point increase in unemployment in the local market was associated with a 1.6-4.1-kcal · capita⁻¹ · d⁻¹ (P < 0.001) increase in total calories purchased. Results also indicated shifts in caloric purchases were driven more by declines in caloric purchases from beverages than food.

CONCLUSIONS

US consumers have exhibited changes in intake and purchasing behavior since 2003 that were independent from changing economic conditions linked with the Great Recession or food prices. Public health efforts in the past decade may have contributed to this trend.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition (SWN, MMS, and BMP) and Carolina Population Center (SWN, BMP), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24429538

Citation

Ng, Shu Wen, et al. "Turning Point for US Diets? Recessionary Effects or Behavioral Shifts in Foods Purchased and Consumed." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 99, no. 3, 2014, pp. 609-16.
Ng SW, Slining MM, Popkin BM. Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;99(3):609-16.
Ng, S. W., Slining, M. M., & Popkin, B. M. (2014). Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 99(3), 609-16. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.113.072892
Ng SW, Slining MM, Popkin BM. Turning Point for US Diets? Recessionary Effects or Behavioral Shifts in Foods Purchased and Consumed. Am J Clin Nutr. 2014;99(3):609-16. PubMed PMID: 24429538.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Turning point for US diets? Recessionary effects or behavioral shifts in foods purchased and consumed. AU - Ng,Shu Wen, AU - Slining,Meghan M, AU - Popkin,Barry M, Y1 - 2014/01/15/ PY - 2014/1/17/entrez PY - 2014/1/17/pubmed PY - 2014/5/3/medline SP - 609 EP - 16 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 99 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: In the past decade, the United States has seen declining energy intakes and plateauing obesity levels. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether these observed trends suggest a longer-term shift in dietary and health behavior that is independent of adverse economic conditions. DESIGN: We used nationally representative cross-sectional surveys on intake and longitudinal household food purchase data along with random-effects models to address this question. Data included individuals in NHANES 2003-2004 to 2009-2010 (children: n = 13,422; adults: n = 10,791) and households from the 2000-2011 Nielsen Homescan Panel (households with children: n = 57,298; households with adults only: n = 108,932). RESULTS: In both data sets, we showed that children decreased their calories the most. Even after we controlled for important socioeconomic factors, caloric purchases fell significantly from 2003 to 2011 (P < 0.001), particularly for households with children. The Great Recession was associated with small increases in caloric purchases, in which a 1-percentage point increase in unemployment in the local market was associated with a 1.6-4.1-kcal · capita⁻¹ · d⁻¹ (P < 0.001) increase in total calories purchased. Results also indicated shifts in caloric purchases were driven more by declines in caloric purchases from beverages than food. CONCLUSIONS: US consumers have exhibited changes in intake and purchasing behavior since 2003 that were independent from changing economic conditions linked with the Great Recession or food prices. Public health efforts in the past decade may have contributed to this trend. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24429538/Turning_point_for_US_diets_Recessionary_effects_or_behavioral_shifts_in_foods_purchased_and_consumed_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.113.072892 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -