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Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective.
J Sports Sci Med. 2005 Mar 01; 4(1):58-65.JS

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyze injuries among adult recreational ice hockey players. This was an observational prospective cohort study with data collected on injuries sustained during one season in the adult recreational ice hockey leagues of Oneida County, NY. The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures. The most common anatomic region injured was the head/neck/face (35%). Collisions were most often reported as the mechanism of injury (44%). Fracture was the most common diagnosis. Of players wearing face protection (full cage or shield, or partial visor/half shield), none suffered facial injuries, while all facial injuries reported were to players not wearing facial protection. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. A lack of protective equipment was associated with 38% of injuries and 24% of injuries involved penalties. A history of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players with 28% re-injuring the same body part. This study's findings suggested various strategies to address player injuries such as mandatory full facial protection and shoulder pads, strict enforcement of game rules, and game rule modifications (no body checking). Further research is needed on the role of preventive rehabilitation in players with previous injury history. Key PointsThe injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures, similar to previous Canadian literature.The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures.38% of injuries involved a lack of protective equipment and 24% of injuries involved penalties.Full facial protection and shoulder pads should be compulsory.Strict enforcement of game rules is necessary.History of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players.

Authors+Show Affiliations

St Elizabeth Medical Center, Trauma Center , 2209 Genesee St., Utica, NY, USA.Department of Physical Therapy, Utica College , Utica, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24431962

Citation

Caputo, Pasqualino, and Douglas J. Mattson. "Recreational Ice Hockey Injuries in Adult Non-checking Leagues: a United States Perspective." Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, vol. 4, no. 1, 2005, pp. 58-65.
Caputo P, Mattson DJ. Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective. J Sports Sci Med. 2005;4(1):58-65.
Caputo, P., & Mattson, D. J. (2005). Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective. Journal of Sports Science & Medicine, 4(1), 58-65.
Caputo P, Mattson DJ. Recreational Ice Hockey Injuries in Adult Non-checking Leagues: a United States Perspective. J Sports Sci Med. 2005 Mar 1;4(1):58-65. PubMed PMID: 24431962.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Recreational ice hockey injuries in adult non-checking leagues: a United States perspective. AU - Caputo,Pasqualino, AU - Mattson,Douglas J, Y1 - 2005/03/01/ PY - 2004/12/20/received PY - 2005/02/08/accepted PY - 2014/1/17/entrez PY - 2005/3/1/pubmed PY - 2005/3/1/medline KW - Ice hockey KW - United States KW - adult KW - old-timer KW - recreational SP - 58 EP - 65 JF - Journal of sports science & medicine JO - J Sports Sci Med VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - The purpose of this study was to analyze injuries among adult recreational ice hockey players. This was an observational prospective cohort study with data collected on injuries sustained during one season in the adult recreational ice hockey leagues of Oneida County, NY. The injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures. The most common anatomic region injured was the head/neck/face (35%). Collisions were most often reported as the mechanism of injury (44%). Fracture was the most common diagnosis. Of players wearing face protection (full cage or shield, or partial visor/half shield), none suffered facial injuries, while all facial injuries reported were to players not wearing facial protection. The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures. A lack of protective equipment was associated with 38% of injuries and 24% of injuries involved penalties. A history of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players with 28% re-injuring the same body part. This study's findings suggested various strategies to address player injuries such as mandatory full facial protection and shoulder pads, strict enforcement of game rules, and game rule modifications (no body checking). Further research is needed on the role of preventive rehabilitation in players with previous injury history. Key PointsThe injury incidence rate was found to be 12.2/1000 player-exposures, similar to previous Canadian literature.The concussion rate was 1.1/1000 player-exposures.38% of injuries involved a lack of protective equipment and 24% of injuries involved penalties.Full facial protection and shoulder pads should be compulsory.Strict enforcement of game rules is necessary.History of prior injuries was found in 89% of injured players. SN - 1303-2968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24431962/Recreational_ice_hockey_injuries_in_adult_non_checking_leagues:_a_United_States_perspective_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/24431962/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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