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Diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake among US adults, overall and by body weight.
Am J Public Health. 2014 Mar; 104(3):e72-8.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We examined national patterns in adult diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake by body-weight status.

METHODS

We analyzed 24-hour dietary recall with National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 data (adults aged ≥ 20 years; n = 23 965).

RESULTS

Overall, 11% of healthy-weight, 19% of overweight, and 22% of obese adults drink diet beverages. Total caloric intake was higher among adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) compared with diet beverages (2351 kcal/day vs 2203 kcal/day; P = .005). However, the difference was only significant for healthy-weight adults (2302 kcal/day vs 2095 kcal/day; P < .001). Among overweight and obese adults, calories from solid-food consumption were higher among adults consuming diet beverages compared with SSBs (overweight: 1965 kcal/day vs 1874 kcal/day; P = .03; obese: 2058 kcal/day vs 1897 kcal/day; P < .001). The net increase in daily solid-food consumption associated with diet-beverage consumption was 88 kilocalories for overweight and 194 kilocalories for obese adults.

CONCLUSIONS

Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sara N. Bleich and Julia A. Wolfson are with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. Seanna Vine and Y. Claire Wang are with the Department of Health Policy and Management, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24432876

Citation

Bleich, Sara N., et al. "Diet-beverage Consumption and Caloric Intake Among US Adults, Overall and By Body Weight." American Journal of Public Health, vol. 104, no. 3, 2014, pp. e72-8.
Bleich SN, Wolfson JA, Vine S, et al. Diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake among US adults, overall and by body weight. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(3):e72-8.
Bleich, S. N., Wolfson, J. A., Vine, S., & Wang, Y. C. (2014). Diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake among US adults, overall and by body weight. American Journal of Public Health, 104(3), e72-8. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301556
Bleich SN, et al. Diet-beverage Consumption and Caloric Intake Among US Adults, Overall and By Body Weight. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(3):e72-8. PubMed PMID: 24432876.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake among US adults, overall and by body weight. AU - Bleich,Sara N, AU - Wolfson,Julia A, AU - Vine,Seanna, AU - Wang,Y Claire, Y1 - 2014/01/16/ PY - 2014/1/18/entrez PY - 2014/1/18/pubmed PY - 2014/4/18/medline SP - e72 EP - 8 JF - American journal of public health JO - Am J Public Health VL - 104 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We examined national patterns in adult diet-beverage consumption and caloric intake by body-weight status. METHODS: We analyzed 24-hour dietary recall with National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 data (adults aged ≥ 20 years; n = 23 965). RESULTS: Overall, 11% of healthy-weight, 19% of overweight, and 22% of obese adults drink diet beverages. Total caloric intake was higher among adults consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) compared with diet beverages (2351 kcal/day vs 2203 kcal/day; P = .005). However, the difference was only significant for healthy-weight adults (2302 kcal/day vs 2095 kcal/day; P < .001). Among overweight and obese adults, calories from solid-food consumption were higher among adults consuming diet beverages compared with SSBs (overweight: 1965 kcal/day vs 1874 kcal/day; P = .03; obese: 2058 kcal/day vs 1897 kcal/day; P < .001). The net increase in daily solid-food consumption associated with diet-beverage consumption was 88 kilocalories for overweight and 194 kilocalories for obese adults. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese adults drink more diet beverages than healthy-weight adults and consume significantly more solid-food calories and a comparable total calories than overweight and obese adults who drink SSBs. Heavier US adults who drink diet beverages will need to reduce solid-food calorie consumption to lose weight. SN - 1541-0048 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24432876/Diet_beverage_consumption_and_caloric_intake_among_US_adults_overall_and_by_body_weight_ L2 - https://www.ajph.org/doi/10.2105/AJPH.2013.301556?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -