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Dietary fat and protein intake are not associated with incident biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy.
JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2015; 39(1):124-8JJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dietary composition can cause insulin resistance, elevated serum lipid levels, and obesity, all of which predispose to gallstone formation. The effects of dietary fat (including individual fatty acids) and protein on gallstone formation are controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dietary fat and protein intake on incident gallstone disease during pregnancy, a high-risk time for stone formation.

METHODS

We prospectively studied 3070 pregnant women who underwent serial gallbladder ultrasound examinations during pregnancy and at 4-6 weeks postpartum. All women had at least 2 study ultrasounds for comparison. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was completed by subjects in the early third trimester. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess the risk of incident gallbladder disease across quartiles of intake of total fat, individual fatty acids (polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, saturated, and total trans-fatty acids, as well as cholesterol), protein, and protein subtype (animal or vegetable based).

RESULTS

The cumulative incidence of new biliary sludge/stones or progression of baseline sludge to stones was 10.2% by 4-6 weeks postpartum. There was no association between total dietary fat (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-2.18 comparing lowest and highest quartiles) or protein intake (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.44-1.22 comparing lowest and highest quartiles) and incident gallbladder disease. There was also no association between individual fatty acids or protein subtype and gallbladder disease.

CONCLUSIONS

Neither total nor subtype of dietary fat or protein was associated with incident biliary stone or sludge formation in this cohort of pregnant women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle.Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle cwko@u.washington.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24443325

Citation

Mathew, Lisa K., and Cynthia Ko. "Dietary Fat and Protein Intake Are Not Associated With Incident Biliary Sludge and Stones During Pregnancy." JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 39, no. 1, 2015, pp. 124-8.
Mathew LK, Ko C. Dietary fat and protein intake are not associated with incident biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2015;39(1):124-8.
Mathew, L. K., & Ko, C. (2015). Dietary fat and protein intake are not associated with incident biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy. JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 39(1), pp. 124-8. doi:10.1177/0148607113520184.
Mathew LK, Ko C. Dietary Fat and Protein Intake Are Not Associated With Incident Biliary Sludge and Stones During Pregnancy. JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr. 2015;39(1):124-8. PubMed PMID: 24443325.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary fat and protein intake are not associated with incident biliary sludge and stones during pregnancy. AU - Mathew,Lisa K, AU - Ko,Cynthia, Y1 - 2014/01/17/ PY - 2014/1/21/entrez PY - 2014/1/21/pubmed PY - 2015/9/29/medline KW - dietary fat KW - dietary protein KW - gallstones KW - pregnancy SP - 124 EP - 8 JF - JPEN. Journal of parenteral and enteral nutrition JO - JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr VL - 39 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dietary composition can cause insulin resistance, elevated serum lipid levels, and obesity, all of which predispose to gallstone formation. The effects of dietary fat (including individual fatty acids) and protein on gallstone formation are controversial. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of dietary fat and protein intake on incident gallstone disease during pregnancy, a high-risk time for stone formation. METHODS: We prospectively studied 3070 pregnant women who underwent serial gallbladder ultrasound examinations during pregnancy and at 4-6 weeks postpartum. All women had at least 2 study ultrasounds for comparison. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was completed by subjects in the early third trimester. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to assess the risk of incident gallbladder disease across quartiles of intake of total fat, individual fatty acids (polyunsaturated, monounsaturated, saturated, and total trans-fatty acids, as well as cholesterol), protein, and protein subtype (animal or vegetable based). RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of new biliary sludge/stones or progression of baseline sludge to stones was 10.2% by 4-6 weeks postpartum. There was no association between total dietary fat (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64-2.18 comparing lowest and highest quartiles) or protein intake (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.44-1.22 comparing lowest and highest quartiles) and incident gallbladder disease. There was also no association between individual fatty acids or protein subtype and gallbladder disease. CONCLUSIONS: Neither total nor subtype of dietary fat or protein was associated with incident biliary stone or sludge formation in this cohort of pregnant women. SN - 1941-2444 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24443325/Dietary_fat_and_protein_intake_are_not_associated_with_incident_biliary_sludge_and_stones_during_pregnancy_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0148607113520184 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -