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Individual differences in commitment to value-based beliefs and the amplification of perceived belief dissimilarity effects.
J Pers. 2015 Apr; 83(2):127-41.JP

Abstract

The commitment to beliefs (CTB) framework (Maxwell-Smith & Esses, 2012) proposes that there are individual differences in the extent to which people generally follow beliefs that are a reflection of their values. The current research hypothesized that CTB would amplify the effects of perceived belief dissimilarity or incompatibility, such that individuals higher in CTB would display more pronounced reactions to belief-relevant groups, events, or individuals seen as incompatible with their value-based beliefs. We tested our hypothesis in three studies that assessed participants' CTB and their perceptions of belief dissimilarity or incompatibility with regard to other religious groups (Study 1), political parties during a national election (Study 2), and their romantic partner (Study 3). CTB amplified the effects of perceived belief dissimilarity or incompatibility on people's biases toward other religious groups, voting intentions and behavior in a national election, and their evaluative and behavioral responses toward their romantic partner. These results collectively suggest that perceptions of belief dissimilarity or incompatibility are particularly important cues for individuals with higher levels of CTB as they encounter other people or events that are relevant to their beliefs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Western University; Ivey Business School, Western University.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24444458

Citation

Maxwell-Smith, Matthew A., et al. "Individual Differences in Commitment to Value-based Beliefs and the Amplification of Perceived Belief Dissimilarity Effects." Journal of Personality, vol. 83, no. 2, 2015, pp. 127-41.
Maxwell-Smith MA, Seligman C, Conway P, et al. Individual differences in commitment to value-based beliefs and the amplification of perceived belief dissimilarity effects. J Pers. 2015;83(2):127-41.
Maxwell-Smith, M. A., Seligman, C., Conway, P., & Cheung, I. (2015). Individual differences in commitment to value-based beliefs and the amplification of perceived belief dissimilarity effects. Journal of Personality, 83(2), 127-41. https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12089
Maxwell-Smith MA, et al. Individual Differences in Commitment to Value-based Beliefs and the Amplification of Perceived Belief Dissimilarity Effects. J Pers. 2015;83(2):127-41. PubMed PMID: 24444458.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Individual differences in commitment to value-based beliefs and the amplification of perceived belief dissimilarity effects. AU - Maxwell-Smith,Matthew A, AU - Seligman,Clive, AU - Conway,Paul, AU - Cheung,Irene, Y1 - 2014/02/27/ PY - 2014/1/22/entrez PY - 2014/1/22/pubmed PY - 2015/12/23/medline SP - 127 EP - 41 JF - Journal of personality JO - J Pers VL - 83 IS - 2 N2 - The commitment to beliefs (CTB) framework (Maxwell-Smith & Esses, 2012) proposes that there are individual differences in the extent to which people generally follow beliefs that are a reflection of their values. The current research hypothesized that CTB would amplify the effects of perceived belief dissimilarity or incompatibility, such that individuals higher in CTB would display more pronounced reactions to belief-relevant groups, events, or individuals seen as incompatible with their value-based beliefs. We tested our hypothesis in three studies that assessed participants' CTB and their perceptions of belief dissimilarity or incompatibility with regard to other religious groups (Study 1), political parties during a national election (Study 2), and their romantic partner (Study 3). CTB amplified the effects of perceived belief dissimilarity or incompatibility on people's biases toward other religious groups, voting intentions and behavior in a national election, and their evaluative and behavioral responses toward their romantic partner. These results collectively suggest that perceptions of belief dissimilarity or incompatibility are particularly important cues for individuals with higher levels of CTB as they encounter other people or events that are relevant to their beliefs. SN - 1467-6494 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24444458/Individual_differences_in_commitment_to_value_based_beliefs_and_the_amplification_of_perceived_belief_dissimilarity_effects_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jopy.12089 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -