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From sound to shape: auditory perception of drawing movements.
J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2014 Jun; 40(3):983-94.JE

Abstract

This study investigates the human ability to perceive biological movements through friction sounds produced by drawings and, furthermore, the ability to recover drawn shapes from the friction sounds generated. In a first experiment, friction sounds, real-time synthesized and modulated by the velocity profile of the drawing gesture, revealed that subjects associated a biological movement to those sounds whose timbre variations were generated by velocity profiles following the 1/3 power law. This finding demonstrates that sounds can adequately inform about human movements if their acoustic characteristics are in accordance with the kinematic rule governing actual movements. Further investigations of our ability to recognize drawn shapes were carried out in 2 association tasks in which both recorded and synthesized sounds had to be associated to both distinct and similar visual shapes. Results revealed that, for both synthesized and recorded sounds, subjects made correct associations for distinct shapes, although some confusion was observed for similar shapes. The comparisons made between recorded and synthesized sounds lead to conclude that the timbre variations induced by the velocity profile enabled the shape recognition. The results are discussed in the context of the ecological and ideomotor frameworks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratoire de Mécanique et d'Acoustique.Laboratoire de Mécanique et d'Acoustique.Laboratoire de Mécanique et d'Acoustique.Laboratoire de Neurosciences Cognitives, CNRS, UMR 7291.Laboratoire de Mécanique et d'Acoustique.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24446717

Citation

Thoret, Etienne, et al. "From Sound to Shape: Auditory Perception of Drawing Movements." Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, vol. 40, no. 3, 2014, pp. 983-94.
Thoret E, Aramaki M, Kronland-Martinet R, et al. From sound to shape: auditory perception of drawing movements. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2014;40(3):983-94.
Thoret, E., Aramaki, M., Kronland-Martinet, R., Velay, J. L., & Ystad, S. (2014). From sound to shape: auditory perception of drawing movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology. Human Perception and Performance, 40(3), 983-94. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035441
Thoret E, et al. From Sound to Shape: Auditory Perception of Drawing Movements. J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform. 2014;40(3):983-94. PubMed PMID: 24446717.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - From sound to shape: auditory perception of drawing movements. AU - Thoret,Etienne, AU - Aramaki,Mitsuko, AU - Kronland-Martinet,Richard, AU - Velay,Jean-Luc, AU - Ystad,Sølvi, Y1 - 2014/01/20/ PY - 2014/1/23/entrez PY - 2014/1/23/pubmed PY - 2015/2/3/medline SP - 983 EP - 94 JF - Journal of experimental psychology. Human perception and performance JO - J Exp Psychol Hum Percept Perform VL - 40 IS - 3 N2 - This study investigates the human ability to perceive biological movements through friction sounds produced by drawings and, furthermore, the ability to recover drawn shapes from the friction sounds generated. In a first experiment, friction sounds, real-time synthesized and modulated by the velocity profile of the drawing gesture, revealed that subjects associated a biological movement to those sounds whose timbre variations were generated by velocity profiles following the 1/3 power law. This finding demonstrates that sounds can adequately inform about human movements if their acoustic characteristics are in accordance with the kinematic rule governing actual movements. Further investigations of our ability to recognize drawn shapes were carried out in 2 association tasks in which both recorded and synthesized sounds had to be associated to both distinct and similar visual shapes. Results revealed that, for both synthesized and recorded sounds, subjects made correct associations for distinct shapes, although some confusion was observed for similar shapes. The comparisons made between recorded and synthesized sounds lead to conclude that the timbre variations induced by the velocity profile enabled the shape recognition. The results are discussed in the context of the ecological and ideomotor frameworks. SN - 1939-1277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24446717/From_sound_to_shape:_auditory_perception_of_drawing_movements_ L2 - http://content.apa.org/journals/xhp/40/3/983 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -