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Blood lead levels among rural Thai children exposed to lead-acid batteries from solar energy conversion systems.
Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2013 Nov; 44(6):1079-87.SA

Abstract

We evaluate blood lead levels among Thai children to determine if exposure to lead-acid batteries is associated with elevated blood lead levels (EBLL). We screened 254 children aged 1-14 years old from 2 rural Thai villages for blood lead levels. We also screened 18 of 92 houses in these 2 villages for the presence of environmental lead. The overall prevalence of EBLL (> or = 10 microg/dl) was 43.3% and the mean lead level among study subjects was 9.8 +/- 5.1 microg/dl. The blood lead levels significantly decreased with increasing age. Fifty point eight percent of children who lived in a house with vented lead-acid batteries had EBLL while 23.3% of children who lived in a house without vented lead-acid batteries had EBLL. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between the presence of vented lead-acid batteries and EBLL, after adjusting for other variables. Forty-two point nine percent of house floor dust samples collected near the batteries had elevated lead levels, 7.1% of house floor dust samples collected from other areas in the house had elevated lead levels and 0% of the house floor dust samples collected in houses without vented lead-acid batteries had elevated lead levels. In the sampled houses with vented lead-acid batteries, lead contamination was found in the drinking-water kept in household containers, but not in the tap water or other village sources of water. Improper care and placement of vented lead-acid batteries can result in lead contamination in the home environment causing EBLL in exposed children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community and Social Medicine, Mae Sot General Hospital, Tak, Thailand. swaddi@hotmail.comUmphang Community Hospital, Tak, Thailand.Umphang Community Hospital, Tak, Thailand.Umphang District Health Office, Tak, Thailand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24450246

Citation

Swaddiwudhipong, Witaya, et al. "Blood Lead Levels Among Rural Thai Children Exposed to Lead-acid Batteries From Solar Energy Conversion Systems." The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, vol. 44, no. 6, 2013, pp. 1079-87.
Swaddiwudhipong W, Tontiwattanasap W, Khunyotying W, et al. Blood lead levels among rural Thai children exposed to lead-acid batteries from solar energy conversion systems. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2013;44(6):1079-87.
Swaddiwudhipong, W., Tontiwattanasap, W., Khunyotying, W., & Sanreun, C. (2013). Blood lead levels among rural Thai children exposed to lead-acid batteries from solar energy conversion systems. The Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 44(6), 1079-87.
Swaddiwudhipong W, et al. Blood Lead Levels Among Rural Thai Children Exposed to Lead-acid Batteries From Solar Energy Conversion Systems. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health. 2013;44(6):1079-87. PubMed PMID: 24450246.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blood lead levels among rural Thai children exposed to lead-acid batteries from solar energy conversion systems. AU - Swaddiwudhipong,Witaya, AU - Tontiwattanasap,Worawit, AU - Khunyotying,Wanlee, AU - Sanreun,Cherd, PY - 2014/1/24/entrez PY - 2014/1/24/pubmed PY - 2014/2/12/medline SP - 1079 EP - 87 JF - The Southeast Asian journal of tropical medicine and public health JO - Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health VL - 44 IS - 6 N2 - We evaluate blood lead levels among Thai children to determine if exposure to lead-acid batteries is associated with elevated blood lead levels (EBLL). We screened 254 children aged 1-14 years old from 2 rural Thai villages for blood lead levels. We also screened 18 of 92 houses in these 2 villages for the presence of environmental lead. The overall prevalence of EBLL (> or = 10 microg/dl) was 43.3% and the mean lead level among study subjects was 9.8 +/- 5.1 microg/dl. The blood lead levels significantly decreased with increasing age. Fifty point eight percent of children who lived in a house with vented lead-acid batteries had EBLL while 23.3% of children who lived in a house without vented lead-acid batteries had EBLL. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between the presence of vented lead-acid batteries and EBLL, after adjusting for other variables. Forty-two point nine percent of house floor dust samples collected near the batteries had elevated lead levels, 7.1% of house floor dust samples collected from other areas in the house had elevated lead levels and 0% of the house floor dust samples collected in houses without vented lead-acid batteries had elevated lead levels. In the sampled houses with vented lead-acid batteries, lead contamination was found in the drinking-water kept in household containers, but not in the tap water or other village sources of water. Improper care and placement of vented lead-acid batteries can result in lead contamination in the home environment causing EBLL in exposed children. SN - 0125-1562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24450246/Blood_lead_levels_among_rural_Thai_children_exposed_to_lead_acid_batteries_from_solar_energy_conversion_systems_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/ruralhealthconcerns.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -