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Oropharyngeal carcinoma in young adults: an alarming national trend.
Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2014; 150(4):594-601OH

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the incidence, treatment methods, and outcomes of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in patients younger than 45 years.

STUDY DESIGN

Retrospective population based.

SETTING

Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) 9 database.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

The SEER 9 database was queried from 1973 to 2009 for OPSCC patients <45 years of age.

RESULTS

There were 1603 patients with OPSCC younger than 45 years. The incidence in patients between 36 and 44 years increased from 0.79 to 1.39 (per 100,000). In the same time period, there was an increase in the rate from 0.20 to 0.42 in whites and a decrease in the rate in African American (AA) patients from 0.67 to 0.32. The proportion of grade III/IV tumors also steadily increased from 28% in 1973 to 1979 to 43% in 2000 to 2009 (P < .0001). Surgery alone was performed in 220 patients (13.72%) and in combination with radiation therapy in 734 patients (45.79%). Five-year survival for the study cohort is 54%. Compared with white patients, AA patients had worse survival (P < .0001). Patients who had surgery, either alone (localized stage patients) or in combination with radiation, had the highest 5-year survival followed by those who had radiation.

CONCLUSIONS

There was an increase in OPSCC in the study patients within the past 4 decades, particularly in those aged 36 to 44 years. Interestingly, the incidence in whites increased and in AA patients it decreased. It is important to note that most of these patients were treated with surgery, either alone or with radiation therapy. The rising incidence within recent decades is thought to be related to human papillomavirus transmission and changes in sexual practices.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24452304

Citation

Gayar, Omar H., et al. "Oropharyngeal Carcinoma in Young Adults: an Alarming National Trend." Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, vol. 150, no. 4, 2014, pp. 594-601.
Gayar OH, Ruterbusch JJ, Elshaikh M, et al. Oropharyngeal carcinoma in young adults: an alarming national trend. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014;150(4):594-601.
Gayar, O. H., Ruterbusch, J. J., Elshaikh, M., Cote, M., Ghanem, T., Hall, F., & Siddiqui, F. (2014). Oropharyngeal carcinoma in young adults: an alarming national trend. Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 150(4), pp. 594-601. doi:10.1177/0194599813519738.
Gayar OH, et al. Oropharyngeal Carcinoma in Young Adults: an Alarming National Trend. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2014;150(4):594-601. PubMed PMID: 24452304.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oropharyngeal carcinoma in young adults: an alarming national trend. AU - Gayar,Omar H, AU - Ruterbusch,Julie J, AU - Elshaikh,Mohamed, AU - Cote,Michele, AU - Ghanem,Tamer, AU - Hall,Francis, AU - Siddiqui,Farzan, Y1 - 2014/01/22/ PY - 2014/1/24/entrez PY - 2014/1/24/pubmed PY - 2014/5/30/medline KW - SEER database KW - oropharyngeal cancer KW - young adults SP - 594 EP - 601 JF - Otolaryngology--head and neck surgery : official journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery JO - Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg VL - 150 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the incidence, treatment methods, and outcomes of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in patients younger than 45 years. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective population based. SETTING: Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) 9 database. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The SEER 9 database was queried from 1973 to 2009 for OPSCC patients <45 years of age. RESULTS: There were 1603 patients with OPSCC younger than 45 years. The incidence in patients between 36 and 44 years increased from 0.79 to 1.39 (per 100,000). In the same time period, there was an increase in the rate from 0.20 to 0.42 in whites and a decrease in the rate in African American (AA) patients from 0.67 to 0.32. The proportion of grade III/IV tumors also steadily increased from 28% in 1973 to 1979 to 43% in 2000 to 2009 (P < .0001). Surgery alone was performed in 220 patients (13.72%) and in combination with radiation therapy in 734 patients (45.79%). Five-year survival for the study cohort is 54%. Compared with white patients, AA patients had worse survival (P < .0001). Patients who had surgery, either alone (localized stage patients) or in combination with radiation, had the highest 5-year survival followed by those who had radiation. CONCLUSIONS: There was an increase in OPSCC in the study patients within the past 4 decades, particularly in those aged 36 to 44 years. Interestingly, the incidence in whites increased and in AA patients it decreased. It is important to note that most of these patients were treated with surgery, either alone or with radiation therapy. The rising incidence within recent decades is thought to be related to human papillomavirus transmission and changes in sexual practices. SN - 1097-6817 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24452304/Oropharyngeal_carcinoma_in_young_adults:_an_alarming_national_trend_ L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0194599813519738?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -