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Silicones as nonocclusive topical agents.
Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2014; 27(3):164-71.SP

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

Silicone excipients are commonly used ingredients because of their emollient and skin-conditioning effects, and their ability to form uniform, water-resistant, yet permeable films. Based on comparisons with organic materials and conflicting knowledge from silicones used in scar treatment, the misconception still exists that silicone topical excipients are occlusive substances that may block the passive loss of water through the upper skin layers. Therefore, 3 types of common silicone excipients and 3 water-in-(oil-plus-silicone) or W/(O + Si) creams, containing 10% (w/w) of the respective silicones, were investigated as a function of time and compared to petrolatum.

METHODS

Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin hydration measurements were carried out after a single topical application on forearm skin of 26 healthy young female volunteers.

RESULTS

Both petrolatum and silicones significantly decreased TEWL 15 min after application, but the measurements for the silicones were not significantly different from the untreated control values. The tested silicones did not moisturize the skin. Petrolatum formed an occlusive layer, creating an increase in skin hydration for more than 4 h. The results measured for the W/(O + Si) creams indicated that they moisturized the skin, without any effect on TEWL.

CONCLUSION

A clear difference was shown between the skin occlusive properties of petrolatum and the water vapor permeability of the common silicone excipient materials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Toxicology, Dermato-Cosmetology and Pharmacognosy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24457536

Citation

De Paepe, K, et al. "Silicones as Nonocclusive Topical Agents." Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, vol. 27, no. 3, 2014, pp. 164-71.
De Paepe K, Sieg A, Le Meur M, et al. Silicones as nonocclusive topical agents. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2014;27(3):164-71.
De Paepe, K., Sieg, A., Le Meur, M., & Rogiers, V. (2014). Silicones as nonocclusive topical agents. Skin Pharmacology and Physiology, 27(3), 164-71. https://doi.org/10.1159/000354914
De Paepe K, et al. Silicones as Nonocclusive Topical Agents. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2014;27(3):164-71. PubMed PMID: 24457536.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Silicones as nonocclusive topical agents. AU - De Paepe,K, AU - Sieg,A, AU - Le Meur,M, AU - Rogiers,V, Y1 - 2014/01/18/ PY - 2012/11/29/received PY - 2013/08/08/accepted PY - 2014/1/25/entrez PY - 2014/1/25/pubmed PY - 2014/9/27/medline SP - 164 EP - 71 JF - Skin pharmacology and physiology JO - Skin Pharmacol Physiol VL - 27 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Silicone excipients are commonly used ingredients because of their emollient and skin-conditioning effects, and their ability to form uniform, water-resistant, yet permeable films. Based on comparisons with organic materials and conflicting knowledge from silicones used in scar treatment, the misconception still exists that silicone topical excipients are occlusive substances that may block the passive loss of water through the upper skin layers. Therefore, 3 types of common silicone excipients and 3 water-in-(oil-plus-silicone) or W/(O + Si) creams, containing 10% (w/w) of the respective silicones, were investigated as a function of time and compared to petrolatum. METHODS: Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and skin hydration measurements were carried out after a single topical application on forearm skin of 26 healthy young female volunteers. RESULTS: Both petrolatum and silicones significantly decreased TEWL 15 min after application, but the measurements for the silicones were not significantly different from the untreated control values. The tested silicones did not moisturize the skin. Petrolatum formed an occlusive layer, creating an increase in skin hydration for more than 4 h. The results measured for the W/(O + Si) creams indicated that they moisturized the skin, without any effect on TEWL. CONCLUSION: A clear difference was shown between the skin occlusive properties of petrolatum and the water vapor permeability of the common silicone excipient materials. SN - 1660-5535 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24457536/Silicones_as_nonocclusive_topical_agents_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000354914 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -