Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prospective study of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy or lactation and risk of childhood asthma: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2014 Apr; 38(4):1002-11.AC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Many women drink during pregnancy and lactation despite recommendations to abstain. In animals, alcohol exposure during pregnancy and lactation influences lung and immune development, plausibly increasing risk of asthma and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Studies in humans are few.

METHODS

In the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, we examined maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy and lactation in relation to risk of current asthma at 36 months (49,138 children), recurrent LRTIs by 36 months (39,791 children), and current asthma at 7 years (13,253 children). Mothers reported frequency and amount of alcohol intake each trimester and the first 3 months following delivery. We calculated adjusted relative risk (aRR), comparing children of drinkers to nondrinkers, using Generalized Linear Models.

RESULTS

A total of 31.8% of mothers consumed alcohol during first trimester, 9.7% during second trimester, and 15.6% during third trimester. Infrequent and low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure showed a modest statistically significant inverse association with current asthma at 36 months (aRRs ~ 0.85). No association was seen with the highest alcohol intakes during the first trimester when alcohol consumption was most common. RRs of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy with recurrent LRTIs were ~1, with sporadic differences in risk for some metrics of intake, but without any consistent pattern. For current asthma at 7 years, similar inverse associations were seen as with current asthma at 36 months but were not statistically significant. Among children breastfed throughout the first 3 months of life, maternal alcohol intake during this time was not significantly associated with any of the 3 outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

The low levels of alcohol exposure during pregnancy or lactation observed in this cohort were not associated with increased risk of asthma or recurrent LRTIs. The slight inverse associations of infrequent or low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure with asthma may not be causal.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chronic Diseases, Division of Epidemiology , Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Epidemiology Branch, Division of Intramural Research , National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24460824

Citation

Magnus, Maria C., et al. "Prospective Study of Maternal Alcohol Intake During Pregnancy or Lactation and Risk of Childhood Asthma: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study." Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, vol. 38, no. 4, 2014, pp. 1002-11.
Magnus MC, DeRoo LA, Håberg SE, et al. Prospective study of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy or lactation and risk of childhood asthma: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2014;38(4):1002-11.
Magnus, M. C., DeRoo, L. A., Håberg, S. E., Magnus, P., Nafstad, P., Nystad, W., & London, S. J. (2014). Prospective study of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy or lactation and risk of childhood asthma: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research, 38(4), 1002-11. https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.12348
Magnus MC, et al. Prospective Study of Maternal Alcohol Intake During Pregnancy or Lactation and Risk of Childhood Asthma: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2014;38(4):1002-11. PubMed PMID: 24460824.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy or lactation and risk of childhood asthma: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study. AU - Magnus,Maria C, AU - DeRoo,Lisa A, AU - Håberg,Siri E, AU - Magnus,Per, AU - Nafstad,Per, AU - Nystad,Wenche, AU - London,Stephanie J, Y1 - 2014/01/24/ PY - 2013/07/08/received PY - 2013/11/25/accepted PY - 2014/1/28/entrez PY - 2014/1/28/pubmed PY - 2014/12/15/medline KW - Alcohol KW - Asthma KW - Breastfeeding KW - Pregnancy KW - Respiratory Tract Infections SP - 1002 EP - 11 JF - Alcoholism, clinical and experimental research JO - Alcohol Clin Exp Res VL - 38 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Many women drink during pregnancy and lactation despite recommendations to abstain. In animals, alcohol exposure during pregnancy and lactation influences lung and immune development, plausibly increasing risk of asthma and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). Studies in humans are few. METHODS: In the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, we examined maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy and lactation in relation to risk of current asthma at 36 months (49,138 children), recurrent LRTIs by 36 months (39,791 children), and current asthma at 7 years (13,253 children). Mothers reported frequency and amount of alcohol intake each trimester and the first 3 months following delivery. We calculated adjusted relative risk (aRR), comparing children of drinkers to nondrinkers, using Generalized Linear Models. RESULTS: A total of 31.8% of mothers consumed alcohol during first trimester, 9.7% during second trimester, and 15.6% during third trimester. Infrequent and low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure showed a modest statistically significant inverse association with current asthma at 36 months (aRRs ~ 0.85). No association was seen with the highest alcohol intakes during the first trimester when alcohol consumption was most common. RRs of maternal alcohol intake during pregnancy with recurrent LRTIs were ~1, with sporadic differences in risk for some metrics of intake, but without any consistent pattern. For current asthma at 7 years, similar inverse associations were seen as with current asthma at 36 months but were not statistically significant. Among children breastfed throughout the first 3 months of life, maternal alcohol intake during this time was not significantly associated with any of the 3 outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: The low levels of alcohol exposure during pregnancy or lactation observed in this cohort were not associated with increased risk of asthma or recurrent LRTIs. The slight inverse associations of infrequent or low-dose prenatal alcohol exposure with asthma may not be causal. SN - 1530-0277 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24460824/Prospective_study_of_maternal_alcohol_intake_during_pregnancy_or_lactation_and_risk_of_childhood_asthma:_the_Norwegian_Mother_and_Child_Cohort_Study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/acer.12348 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -