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Adipokines and obesity are associated with colorectal polyps in adult males: a cross-sectional study.
PLoS One 2014; 9(1):e85939Plos

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Obesity increases the risk of colon cancer. It is also known that most colorectal cancers develop from adenomatous polyps. However, the effects of obesity and adipokines on colonic polyp formation are unknown.

METHODS

To determine if BMI, waist circumference or adipokines are associated with colon polyps in males, 126 asymptomatic men (48-65 yr) were recruited at time of colonoscopy, and anthropometric measures as well as blood were collected. Odds ratios were determined using polytomous logistic regression for polyp number (0 or ≥3) and polyp type (no polyp, hyperplastic polyp, tubular adenoma).

RESULTS

41% of the men in our study were obese (BMI ≥30). The odds of an obese individual having ≥3 polyps was 6.5 (CI: 1.3-33.0) times greater than those of a lean (BMI<25) individual. Additionally, relative to lean individuals, obese individuals were 7.8 (CI: 2.0-30.8) times more likely to have a tubular adenoma than no polyp. As BMI category increased, participants were 2.9 (CI: 1.5-5.4) times more likely to have a tubular adenoma than no polyps. Serum leptin, IP-10 and TNF-α were significantly associated with tubular adenoma presence. Serum leptin and IP-10 were significantly associated with increased likelihood of ≥3 polyps, and TNF-α showed a trend (p = 0.09).

CONCLUSIONS

Obese men are more likely to have at least three polyps and adenomas. This cross-sectional study provides evidence that colonoscopy should be recommended for obese, white males.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America ; Tri-County Gastroenterology, Professional Corporation, Clinton Township, Michigan, United States of America.College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America ; College of Osteopathic Medicine, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24465801

Citation

Comstock, Sarah S., et al. "Adipokines and Obesity Are Associated With Colorectal Polyps in Adult Males: a Cross-sectional Study." PloS One, vol. 9, no. 1, 2014, pp. e85939.
Comstock SS, Hortos K, Kovan B, et al. Adipokines and obesity are associated with colorectal polyps in adult males: a cross-sectional study. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(1):e85939.
Comstock, S. S., Hortos, K., Kovan, B., McCaskey, S., Pathak, D. R., & Fenton, J. I. (2014). Adipokines and obesity are associated with colorectal polyps in adult males: a cross-sectional study. PloS One, 9(1), pp. e85939. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0085939.
Comstock SS, et al. Adipokines and Obesity Are Associated With Colorectal Polyps in Adult Males: a Cross-sectional Study. PLoS ONE. 2014;9(1):e85939. PubMed PMID: 24465801.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adipokines and obesity are associated with colorectal polyps in adult males: a cross-sectional study. AU - Comstock,Sarah S, AU - Hortos,Kari, AU - Kovan,Bruce, AU - McCaskey,Sarah, AU - Pathak,Dorothy R, AU - Fenton,Jenifer I, Y1 - 2014/01/17/ PY - 2013/10/14/received PY - 2013/12/03/accepted PY - 2014/1/28/entrez PY - 2014/1/28/pubmed PY - 2014/9/19/medline SP - e85939 EP - e85939 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 9 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Obesity increases the risk of colon cancer. It is also known that most colorectal cancers develop from adenomatous polyps. However, the effects of obesity and adipokines on colonic polyp formation are unknown. METHODS: To determine if BMI, waist circumference or adipokines are associated with colon polyps in males, 126 asymptomatic men (48-65 yr) were recruited at time of colonoscopy, and anthropometric measures as well as blood were collected. Odds ratios were determined using polytomous logistic regression for polyp number (0 or ≥3) and polyp type (no polyp, hyperplastic polyp, tubular adenoma). RESULTS: 41% of the men in our study were obese (BMI ≥30). The odds of an obese individual having ≥3 polyps was 6.5 (CI: 1.3-33.0) times greater than those of a lean (BMI<25) individual. Additionally, relative to lean individuals, obese individuals were 7.8 (CI: 2.0-30.8) times more likely to have a tubular adenoma than no polyp. As BMI category increased, participants were 2.9 (CI: 1.5-5.4) times more likely to have a tubular adenoma than no polyps. Serum leptin, IP-10 and TNF-α were significantly associated with tubular adenoma presence. Serum leptin and IP-10 were significantly associated with increased likelihood of ≥3 polyps, and TNF-α showed a trend (p = 0.09). CONCLUSIONS: Obese men are more likely to have at least three polyps and adenomas. This cross-sectional study provides evidence that colonoscopy should be recommended for obese, white males. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24465801/Adipokines_and_obesity_are_associated_with_colorectal_polyps_in_adult_males:_a_cross_sectional_study_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0085939 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -