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Alcohol drinking and multiple myeloma risk--a systematic review and meta-analysis of the dose-risk relationship.
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2014 Mar; 23(2):113-21.EJ

Abstract

The role of alcohol intake in the risk for multiple myeloma (MM) is unclear, although some recent findings suggest an inverse relationship. To summarize the information on the topic, we carried out a systematic review and a dose-risk meta-analysis of published data. Through the literature search until August 2013, we identified 18 studies, eight case-control and 10 cohort studies, carried out in a total of 5694 MM patients. We derived pooled meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models, taking into account the correlation between estimates, and we carried out a dose-risk analysis using a class of nonlinear random-effects meta-regression models. The relative risk for alcohol drinkers versus non/occasional drinkers was 0.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.10] overall, 0.96 (95% CI, 0.74-1.24) among case-control studies, and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.89-1.13) among cohort studies. Compared with nondrinkers, the pooled relative risks were 0.96 (95% CI, 0.81-1.13) for light (i.e. ≤ 1 drink/day) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.74-1.07) for moderate-to-heavy (i.e. >1 drink/day) alcohol drinkers. The dose-risk analysis revealed a model-based MM risk reduction of about 15% at two to four drinks/day (i.e. 25-50 g of ethanol). The present meta-analysis of published data found no strong association between alcohol drinking and MM risk, although a modest favorable effect emerged for moderate-to-heavy alcohol drinkers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

aDepartment of Health Sciences, Centre of Biostatistics for Clinical Epidemiology bDepartment of Statistics and Quantitative Methods, University of Milan-Bicocca cDepartment of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan dDepartment of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri eDivision of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy fDepartment of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden gThe Tisch Cancer Institute and Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA hInternational Prevention Research Institute, Lyon, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24469244

Citation

Rota, Matteo, et al. "Alcohol Drinking and Multiple Myeloma Risk--a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Dose-risk Relationship." European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), vol. 23, no. 2, 2014, pp. 113-21.
Rota M, Porta L, Pelucchi C, et al. Alcohol drinking and multiple myeloma risk--a systematic review and meta-analysis of the dose-risk relationship. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2014;23(2):113-21.
Rota, M., Porta, L., Pelucchi, C., Negri, E., Bagnardi, V., Bellocco, R., Corrao, G., Boffetta, P., & La Vecchia, C. (2014). Alcohol drinking and multiple myeloma risk--a systematic review and meta-analysis of the dose-risk relationship. European Journal of Cancer Prevention : the Official Journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP), 23(2), 113-21. https://doi.org/10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000001
Rota M, et al. Alcohol Drinking and Multiple Myeloma Risk--a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Dose-risk Relationship. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2014;23(2):113-21. PubMed PMID: 24469244.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol drinking and multiple myeloma risk--a systematic review and meta-analysis of the dose-risk relationship. AU - Rota,Matteo, AU - Porta,Lorenzo, AU - Pelucchi,Claudio, AU - Negri,Eva, AU - Bagnardi,Vincenzo, AU - Bellocco,Rino, AU - Corrao,Giovanni, AU - Boffetta,Paolo, AU - La Vecchia,Carlo, PY - 2014/1/29/entrez PY - 2014/1/29/pubmed PY - 2014/10/11/medline SP - 113 EP - 21 JF - European journal of cancer prevention : the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP) JO - Eur J Cancer Prev VL - 23 IS - 2 N2 - The role of alcohol intake in the risk for multiple myeloma (MM) is unclear, although some recent findings suggest an inverse relationship. To summarize the information on the topic, we carried out a systematic review and a dose-risk meta-analysis of published data. Through the literature search until August 2013, we identified 18 studies, eight case-control and 10 cohort studies, carried out in a total of 5694 MM patients. We derived pooled meta-analytic estimates using random-effects models, taking into account the correlation between estimates, and we carried out a dose-risk analysis using a class of nonlinear random-effects meta-regression models. The relative risk for alcohol drinkers versus non/occasional drinkers was 0.97 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.85-1.10] overall, 0.96 (95% CI, 0.74-1.24) among case-control studies, and 1.00 (95% CI, 0.89-1.13) among cohort studies. Compared with nondrinkers, the pooled relative risks were 0.96 (95% CI, 0.81-1.13) for light (i.e. ≤ 1 drink/day) and 0.89 (95% CI, 0.74-1.07) for moderate-to-heavy (i.e. >1 drink/day) alcohol drinkers. The dose-risk analysis revealed a model-based MM risk reduction of about 15% at two to four drinks/day (i.e. 25-50 g of ethanol). The present meta-analysis of published data found no strong association between alcohol drinking and MM risk, although a modest favorable effect emerged for moderate-to-heavy alcohol drinkers. SN - 1473-5709 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24469244/Alcohol_drinking_and_multiple_myeloma_risk__a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_the_dose_risk_relationship_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/CEJ.0000000000000001 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -