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Analgesic effect of minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain.
Eur J Pharmacol 2014; 727:87-98EJ

Abstract

The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Road, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA; Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. Electronic address: sengupta@mcw.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

24485889

Citation

Kannampalli, Pradeep, et al. "Analgesic Effect of Minocycline in Rat Model of Inflammation-induced Visceral Pain." European Journal of Pharmacology, vol. 727, 2014, pp. 87-98.
Kannampalli P, Pochiraju S, Bruckert M, et al. Analgesic effect of minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Eur J Pharmacol. 2014;727:87-98.
Kannampalli, P., Pochiraju, S., Bruckert, M., Shaker, R., Banerjee, B., & Sengupta, J. N. (2014). Analgesic effect of minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. European Journal of Pharmacology, 727, pp. 87-98. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2014.01.026.
Kannampalli P, et al. Analgesic Effect of Minocycline in Rat Model of Inflammation-induced Visceral Pain. Eur J Pharmacol. 2014 Mar 15;727:87-98. PubMed PMID: 24485889.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Analgesic effect of minocycline in rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. AU - Kannampalli,Pradeep, AU - Pochiraju,Soumya, AU - Bruckert,Mitchell, AU - Shaker,Reza, AU - Banerjee,Banani, AU - Sengupta,Jyoti N, Y1 - 2014/01/28/ PY - 2013/08/19/received PY - 2014/01/08/revised PY - 2014/01/12/accepted PY - 2014/2/4/entrez PY - 2014/2/4/pubmed PY - 2015/1/30/medline KW - Microglia KW - Minocycline KW - Satellite glial cell KW - TNBS KW - Visceral pain SP - 87 EP - 98 JF - European journal of pharmacology JO - Eur. J. Pharmacol. VL - 727 N2 - The present study investigates the analgesic effect of minocycline, a semi-synthetic tetracycline antibiotic, in a rat model of inflammation-induced visceral pain. Inflammation was induced in male rats by intracolonic administration of tri-nitrobenzenesulphonic acid (TNBS). Visceral hyperalgesia was assessed by comparing the viscero-motor response (VMR) to graded colorectal distension (CRD) prior and post 7 days after TNBS treatment. Electrophysiology recordings from CRD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferents (PNA) and lumbo-sacral (LS) spinal neurons were performed in naïve and inflamed rats. Colonic inflammation produced visceral hyperalgesia characterized by increase in the VMRs to CRD accompanied with simultaneous activation of microglia in the spinal cord and satellite glial cells (SGCs) in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Selectively inhibiting the glial activation following inflammation by araC (Arabinofuranosyl Cytidine) prevented the development of visceral hyperalgesia. Intrathecal minocycline significantly attenuated the VMR to CRD in inflamed rats, whereas systemic minocycline produced a delayed effect. In electrophysiology experiments, minocycline significantly attenuated the mechanotransduction of CRD-sensitive PNAs and the responses of CRD-sensitive LS spinal neurons in TNBS-treated rats. While the spinal effect of minocycline was observed within 5min of administration, systemic injection of the drug produced a delayed effect (60min) in inflamed rats. Interestingly, minocycline did not exhibit analgesic effect in naïve, non-inflamed rats. The results demonstrate that intrathecal injection of minocycline can effectively attenuate inflammation-induced visceral hyperalgesia. Minocycline might as well act on neuronal targets in the spinal cord of inflamed rats, in addition to the widely reported glial inhibitory action to produce analgesia. SN - 1879-0712 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/24485889/Analgesic_effect_of_minocycline_in_rat_model_of_inflammation_induced_visceral_pain_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0014-2999(14)00045-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -